Aerial Uvic.jpg

COURSES INVENTORY

UVic is a global leader in climate research, which means students have the opportunity to take classes from researchers at the forefront of the field. We have compiled a list of courses from nine faculties across campus, including the Faculty of Continuing Studies, that focus on climate change, climate solutions, sustainability and other environmental issues. 

You can navigate through the course list by faculty using the buttons below. 

Clicking on the course information will bring you to its entry in the UVic Calendar.

 

Business

Title
Course
Department
Description
Designing Innovative Organizations
MBA 553
Business (BUSI)
Examines the complexities and ambiguities relevant to the design, development and management of sustainable organizations in a changing world. Focuses on the changing nature of work (e.g. gig economy, automation, knowledge work), innovations centred on improving the practice of work (e.g. workplace democracy, sociocracy, holocracy). Includes topics such as ethics and governance, organizational forms (e.g. worker co-operatives, L3Cs, social movements), environment structure and growth; organizational culture, power, politics and change management for sustainable innovation.
Foundations of Sustainability
MBA 514
Business (BUSI)
Shows how business can be sustainable, profitable and a force for social change. Explores opportunities and challenges for developing more sustainable business strategies and practices, and the changing role of business in relation to society and the environment. Introduces the business case for sustainability, sustainability reporting, socially responsible investing, First Nations/Indigenous approaches to economic development, ethics, gender equity and human rights.
Capstone Integrative Project
MBA 596
Business (BUSI)
Encourages an integrative, immersive experience where teams apply their learning in sustainable innovation to an actual challenge or opportunity faced by a real world client. Teams work with the available resources to overcome obstacles and successfully navigate organizations and multiple perspectives, to develop recommendations for actionable high-impact solutions. Core learning includes: decision-making, critical thinking, application of concepts, teamwork, integrating multidisciplinary perspectives, project management and client relationships.
Global Sustainable Business
MBA 570
Business (BUSI)
Overview of international business and management, emphasizing sustainability, globalization and their implications for individuals, organizations and nations. Explores global and regional economic integration, sources of national competitive advantage and international trade and investment in international contexts, strategy and organization in multinational enterprises, emerging markets, and current issues related to the international business environment. Students develop a world-view of today's dynamic global marketplace and analytical skills for addressing complex global issues.
Public Policy and Law
MBA 577
Business (BUSI)
Explores how government policy affects industry in the context of sustainable innovation, and how organizations can work effectively with government. Examines legal issues that must be identified and effectively managed within organizations (including for-profit, non-profit, and governmental organizations). Considers public policy and risks associated with sustainable manufacturing, delivery and marketing, customer privacy, intellectual property, and employment and contractor relationships.
Capstone Research Project
MBA 598
Business (BUSI)
Encourages an advanced analysis and exploration of a significant organizational problem or policy issue related to sustainable innovation. Builds skills in quantitative and qualitative research, analysis, critical thinking, and academic writing.
Accounting and Financial Responsibility
MBA 520
Business (BUSI)
Develops the capacity to make informed, ethical and sustainability-focused decisions through the use of accounting principles. Focuses on two broad areas: 1) Financial Reporting including examination of corporate financial reports, International Financial Accounting Standards, sustainability reporting standards and evolving practices, fiduciary duty and governance; and 2) Managerial Accounting including the nature, analysis of costs, product costs, and control systems.
Business Economics
MBA 515
Business (BUSI)
Explores both the benefits and limitations of traditional economic models. Shows how individual and organizational factors affect economic decisions. Topics include product, pricing, risk and business opportunity analysis, behavioural decision theory, sustainable economic models, sustainable value creation under different market structures, international trade, game theory and moral hazard.
Global Sustainable Business
MBA 570
Business (BUSI)
This course takes an International Business environment perspective on global issues. Traditional frameworks are revisited in the context of ecology, ethical decision making, cultural differences. Topics include institutions of global business, government policies in a fractured global system, strategy and structure in a challenging international environment.
Social Entrepreneurship
MBA 564
Business (BUSI)
Entrepreneurship is about new value creation for customers and society. Takes prospective entrepreneurs through the opportunity (value) identification and realization process with a focus on developing entrepreneurial expertise and an entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial mindset. Topics include business model design, new organization forms, marketing on a shoestring, merging and selling. Students will apply the learning towards their own entrepreneurial or intrapreneurial pursuit, with the aim of getting to the proof-of-concept stage of development with a lean business plan.
Corporate Relations and Responsibilities
COM 435
Business (BUSI)
Examines the relations of a corporation to its stakeholders - customers, stockholders, government, unions and society at large. Especially important are a firm's code of ethics and conduct, written and unwritten, which governs its relationships and spells out its responsibilities to its various publics. Students study and discuss a number of cases which illustrate how a variety of organizations have responded to this challenge.
Technology and the Interconnected Organization
MBA 544
Business (BUSI)
Develops the foundation for a critical understanding of the relationship between technology, information systems (IS) and sustainable organizational performance. Three themes focus on creating and protecting value using IS, developing, implementing and evaluating IS and managing IS. Topics include business model innovation, social computing, IT governance, cybersecurity, and artificial intelligence.
Sustainable Operations Management
MBA 535
Business (BUSI)
Explores the management systems organizations use to deliver goods and services to provide sustainable value. Topics include operations strategy, lifecycle management, sustainable supply chains, eco-design, capacity and technology planning, workflow planning, service design and delivery, scheduling, and quality management and control.
Finance for Impact
MBA 530
Business (BUSI)
Focus on how to integrate sustainability, social and environmental impact objectives in financial decision-making. Topics covered include: material environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues affecting firms' activities and the pricing of risk in financial markets; capital budgeting decisions and transition risk; ESG integration into equity/debt valuation and portfolio investments; green and social bonds; impact investing; indigenous finance; and other issues that may arise during the term depending on new market developments. Issues related to climate change physical and transition risks are frequently discussed throughout the course.
People and the Future of Work
MBA 555
Business (BUSI)
Examines the contemporary workplace and its implications for people. Topics include decision making, motivation, and trust; talent development, teams, employee engagement, HR practices (e.g. recruitment and retention, performance and compensation, layoffs, legislation).
International Financial Management
MGB 512
Business (BUSI)
An examination of international financial markets and the financial decision making of multinational firms. Topics include international monetary systems, exchange rate determination, foreign currency derivatives, risk management techniques, and investments, financing and operations in global markets. Includes discussion of global trends in sustainable finance and impact investing, in addition to an integrated including a joint assignment with Adel (MGB 519) and Wade (MGB 516) on a company from Climate Action 100+ to analyse how it integrates sustainability in its international strategy, supply chain, and finance. Students also analyse tech company's strategy with respect to dealing with climate risk.
Strategic Collaboration and Partnerships
MBA 552
Business (BUSI)
Explores when and how to lead and cultivate collaboration in both inter- and intra-organizational contexts. In today's complex environments, sustainable innovation will be achieved through working collaboratively with others. Topics include: costs and benefits of collaboration, levers and barriers to collaboration, characteristics of collaborative leadership, types of collaboration (alliances, networks, and public-private partnerships), evaluating collaboration, as well as developing relationships with stakeholders.
Strategy for the Long Term
MBA 550
Business (BUSI)
Explores the need for business transformation, rather than continuous improvement, as the global challenge of sustainability comes to dominate the competitive environment. Topics include 100-year viability, analyses of external and internal environments, reinventing the business model, opportunity evaluation, the role of innovation, value co-creation, corporate social responsibility (CSR).
Marketing in a Connected World
MBA 510
Business (BUSI)
Considers marketers' responsibilities to shareholders, society and the planet. Topics include factors affecting consumer demand and methods of satisfying it, market structure, product selection, distribution, promotion, pricing and market research. Explores the special considerations involved in sustainable marketing, e.g. brand trust, absorption of full lifecycle costs, product traceability and consumer resistance. Considers the impact of digital and social media, popups and buycotts, and the effective use of these channels.
Innovation and Design
MBA 546
Business (BUSI)
Considers both the "why" (who benefits, who pays) and "how" of innovation. Explores how design thinking can lend new perspectives on wicked problems in society and business. Students develop skills as creative problem solvers who combine rigorous research with narrative, visual data and other knowledge forms to generate sustainable strategies.
Responsible and Ethical Leadership
MBA 523
Business (BUSI)
Emphasizes the being, doing and knowing of responsible leadership. Focuses on individual self-awareness and self-responsibility for developing a purpose-focused leadership approach to create solutions, disrupt mindsets, and champion sustainable innovation. Explores the role of leaders as individuals, leaders embedded in organizations, and leaders facing the global opportunities and issues both today and in the future.
Business and Sustainability
COM 362
Business (BUSI)
Introduces the changing role of business as managers face many social, political, economic, and ecological forces. Examines how these forces pressure businesses to question existing traditional operating approaches. Introduces key concepts of corporate social responsibility, business and sustainability, sustainable development, and social entrepreneurship. Examines how firms respond to calls for more sustainable economic, social, and ecological operating approaches. Introduces concepts, tools and frameworks that assist businesses to effect transition to more sustainable practices.

Education

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
Environmental Education
BIOL370
Curriculum and Instruction Studies (EDCI)
This multidisciplinary course is designed to familiarize the educator with a range of issues and teaching methods related to environmental education. Topics include goals for environmental and outdoor education; environmental ethics; current issues and trends; multicultural perspectives towards the land; local, national and global issues, teaching strategies for understanding and resolving environmental issues; program and unit planning. Selected field trips to locations emphasizing current environmental issues.
Media Activism, Social Justice, and Educational Change
BIOL351
Curriculum and Instruction Studies (EDCI)
Explores the power and possibility of using media and communication technologies for substantive societal change. Introduces students to current and possible future uses of mainstream and alternative media to challenge existing power structures, to assist in representing marginalized and underrepresented groups, and to link communities of interest in aid of the attainment of social, political, economic, environmental and cultural justice through educational change.
Ecology for Teachers
BIOL215
Curriculum and Instruction Studies (EDCI)
Labs, field trips and inquiry activities explore the major ecosystems in British Columbia as a focus for instruction. Topics include the natural history of plants and animals, the ecology of communities and ecosystems and human impacts emphasizing the Pacific Northwest. Intended to provide teachers with information and skills to explore the outdoor environment as a focus for instruction: to plan and organize field trips, teach nature appreciation, inquiry techniques, ecology concepts and stewardship.
Special Topic in Indigenous Education: Contemporary environmental thought
IED 399
Indigenous Education (INED)
This course will introduce learners to various schools of environmental thought that surround contemporary citizenship, with special focus on Indigenous environmental perspectives. Course participants will explore the ways that knowledge and education underline environmental decision-making, and how Indigenous education is an important means to a sustainable future.
Curriculum and Instruction in Indigenous-focused Science
IED 403
Indigenous Education (INED)
A study of the curriculum organization, experiential and participatory instructional strategies and assessment practices in elementary school science that centers local Indigenous knowledge. Includes the consideration of western science and other nature knowledge systems, the interactions of science, technology, society and environment and the content, processes and attitudes prescribed in the provincial curriculum. Focused on current ecological and climate realities.
Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary School Physical Education
EPHE 764
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
In this course, students acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to design instruction and activities that are challenging and meaningful, and allow for successful student learning experience; develop and implement an orderly and supportive learning environment in physical and health education class; develop and implement teaching strategies that optimize student learning; develop an appreciation for a variety of professional challenges associated with effective teaching in physical and health education (i.e. gender equity, health, pro-social behaviour, personal and social learning outcomes); discuss the values and skills that contribute to your personal approach toward teaching physical and health education. Particular focus is on learning nature-based physical activities through an experiential manner - time in local natural areas, as well as the emotional, social, mental, and physical benefits of time spent being active in nature.
Cultural and Outdoor Physical Activity
EPHE 435
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
EPHE 435 was originally created as part of the Community, Culture and Environment Strand in the elementary education program. Although the strand no longer exists, using Physical and Health Education [PHE] to contribute to community, culture, and the environment is still relevant for elementary school educators. EPHE 435 provides the opportunity for students to develop an understanding and appreciation for a variety of outdoor physical activities and cultural movement forms suitable for elementary school children. This course includes field trips and experiential professional development opportunities in order to further explore environmental and outdoor education.
Overview of Elementary and Middle School Physical Education
EPHE 312
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education
This course provides an overview of the content and structure of the BC elementary and middle school physical and health education (PHE) curriculum. Students will be introduced to basic pedagogical skills necessary to implement a quality PHE program. Focus will be on the learning of movement skills and on the developing child as a learner. A variety of teaching experiences will be included. Particular focus is on learning nature-based physical activities through an experiential manner - time in local natural areas, as well as the emotional, social, mental, and physical benefits of time spent being active in nature.

Engineering

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
Environmental Engineering
CIVE310
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Environmental systems analysis techniques for natural and engineered systems. Sources, characteristics, transport, and effects of air and water contaminants; biological, chemical, and physical processes in water; unit operations for air and water quality control; water and wastewater treatment processes; solid waste management; environmental quality standards. Design, planning, and management of engineered environmental systems.
Energy Systems Decarbonization
CIVE465
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Energy systems concepts spanning sectors (buildings, transportation, power systems) and scales (cities, provinces, countries, the globe). Emissions and decarbonization, trade-offs, low-carbon technologies. Modelling for decision-making: model design, workflow, scenario matrices; limitations, transparency, accuracy, breadth; data handling, optimization and visualization in python. Development and application of energy systems models.
Sustainable Buildings: Retrofitting, Repairs, and Recycling
CIVE451
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Specialties of housing in remote communities integrating aspects of structural engineering, rural municipal engineering, transportation engineering while mitigating ecological footprints; major retrofit issues that consider safety, serviceability and aspects dealing with environmental factors, energy consumption and movement of moisture. Potential for recycling building materials for further use.
Sustainability in Civil Engineering
CIVE210
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Global and local sustainability context; planetary boundaries; footprints. Conceptions of sustainability. Tools, methods and frameworks in sustainable assessment, planning and design - life cycle assessment, substance flow analysis of socioeconomic metabolism, resource efficiency analysis, energy return on investment and accounting of externalities. Uncertainty and risk management. Related policy - environmental impact assessment, pressure state response model. Sustainable Energy. Green design case studies.
Green Building Design
CIVE450
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Design and construction concepts: site sustainability, water efficiency, energy flows, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality. Life cycle analysis methods, including estimation of material and energy flows in the construction, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of the built environment. Innovative design and integration. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification criteria.
Solid Waste, Air, and Water Pollution
CIVE410
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Urban sources of air and water pollution, acute and chronic health effects of pollution taught through case studies; environmental quality standards and compliance criteria in BC and Canada; air and water quality modelling for prediction, introduction to software; integrated waste management and design, reduce, reuse, recycle, resource recovery and utilization, composting, fundamentals of waste degradation and disposal, geo-environmental aspects of landfill design, leachate and gas management at landfills.
Sustainable Water Resources
CIVE340
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Design and environmental integration of a water resource system using simulation and geomatics software. Introduction to hydrology; hydraulic engineering, and water resources planning; environment and management of watersheds and ecosystems; risk and uncertainty; urban water systems and water quality; economic demand and supply principles, externalities.
Environmental Policy
CIVE315
Civil Engineering (CIVE)
Introduction to environmental policy, law and governance and cultural and sociological implications of sustainable engineering. How policy is formed and changed. Civil engineering development in First Nations.
Green Vehicle Technology Project
MECH497
Mechanical Engineering (MECH)
General background of Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) technologies; green vehicle technology training by industry experts; design using advanced modeling and simulation tools; design, analysis, prototyping and testing of vehicle subsystems or key components for green vehicle technology development. Each student presents a complete report at the end of the term and makes an oral presentation of the findings.
Wind Power Systems
MECH444
Mechanical Engineering (MECH)
History of wind power. Wind resource characteristics. Aerodynamic analysis: steady and unsteady rotor flow models, sectional aerodynamics. Aeroelastic response: structural models, degree of freedom reduction, time-domain simulation. Control: objectives, hierarchy, methods, classical and modern approaches. Electrical aspects: generator concepts and control, grid integration. Component design and structural analysis. Wind farms. Levelized cost of energy.
Fundamentals of Hybrid Vehicles
MECH459
Mechanical Engineering (MECH)
Advance of hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) technology; power plants, electric propulsion systems, transmissions, and onboard energy storage systems; fuel cell vehicles; vehicle performance modelling and simulation using advanced vehicle powertrain modelling tools; design and optimization of HEV powertrain system; and HEV design case studies.

Fine Arts

 

Human & Social Development

 

Humanities

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
Governance for Planetary Health
ADMN 331
Public Administration (ADMIN)
Provides students a foundational understanding of Planetary Health from an interdisciplinary lens. Focuses on transformative governance strategies embracing the environmental, political, economic, social and cultural dimensions to achieve high standards of health, well-being, equity and ecological prosperity. Explores pathways and policy solutions at the local, regional, national and global levels for reconciling natural and human systems.
Special Topics: Sustainability transitions
ADM 548
Public Administration (ADMIN)
Takes an interdisciplinary approach to sustainable management of society's energy and materials flows. Topics range from thermodynamics and estimates of global resources to market-based policies and governance institutions that can enable sustainability transitions at local, national, and global levels. Concepts of peak oil, renewable energy, behavioural change, economic growth, and civil activism are also discussed.
Title
Course
Department
Description
Literature of British Columbia
ENGL 456
English (ENGL)
Introduction to the literature of the province and to regional literary studies. Topics include local geography and history; indigeneity, colonialism, and postcolonialism; literary languages and genres; canon formation; modernism and postmodernism; western exceptionalism; environments and economies; visions of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. (Always has a climate dimension.)
Special Studies in Literature and Environment
ENGL478
English (ENGL)
A study of topics in the field of ecocriticism, including how human relationships to natural landscapes and animals are mediated through literature; literature in relation to imperial, colonial and capitalist ecologies; literary production as shaping and shaped by global agencies and events of nature; the role of literature in an era of globalization and ecological crisis.
Nature and the Environment in French-Speaking Cultures
FRAN445
French (FRAN)
Explores the representations, thoughts and the position of human beings within their natural environment in the arts (literature, theatre, film, paintings) from the 16th century to the present. Through key concepts such as the anthropocene and the nature-culture dualism, and by using theoretical approaches such as eco/geocriticism and ecofeminism, exposes students to new ways of understanding how we can critically and sensitively re-imagine the environmental humanities today and into the future.
Environmental History of the World
HSTR101E
History (HSTR)
Explores the interaction between humankind and the global environment with emphasis on the post-1492 period. Central topics include the agricultural revolution, animal domestication, the Columbian Exchange, capitalism and industrialization, the impact of fossil fuels, species extinction, climate change, and environmentalism.
Environmental History of British Columbia
HSTR325
History (HSTR)
Examines the cultural, social and political interactions between humans and the environment in British Columbia from the pre-contact period to the present.
Philosophy and the Environment
PHIL333/ES314
Philosophy (PHIL)
A philosophical investigation of the moral and conceptual dimensions of environmental problems. Different philosophies of the relation between humans and nature will be compared.
Religion & The Environment
RS307
Religious Studies (RS)
Surveys of the influence religious beliefs and practices have had upon humanity's understanding of the environment (nature). a Consideration of the contributions that religious ethics can make to our reflection on specific environmental issues.
Indigenous Latin America, Social Justice, Environment (in English)
SPAN304
Spanish (SPAN)
Focuses on globally relevant social and environmental issues being addressed by Indigenous peoples in countries such as Bolivia, Brazil, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru. In-depth study of themes including decolonization, education, and social mobilization. Lectures, film excerpts, guest speakers, student presentations and thought-provoking dialogue.

Law

 

Science

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
Environmental Law
LAW329
Law (LAW)
This is a foundational course for students interested in environmental law and policy. Students acquire an overview of recent developments and debates within this area. Topics addressed include federalism and the environment, common law rights and remedies, public participation and judicial review, market mechanisms for environmental protection, endangered species, and trade and the environment. A key focus concerns the extent to which environmental law reflects, or fails to reflect, evolving social and other values.
Field Course in Environmental Law and Sustainability
LAW384
Law (LAW)
Explores the structures of reconciliation, law, policy and sustainability in a specific territory on the west coast of BC. Analyzes co-existing Indigenous and state jurisdictional and governance systems that shape a region.
Environmental Law Centre Clinic
LAW353
Law (LAW)
An opportunity to study the theory and engage in the practice of public interest environmental lawyering in a supervised clinical setting. Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal information and assistance to environmental NGOs, community groups and First Nations. They also develop public interest lawyering skills including advocacy through media, client counselling and case development and management. The class meets for a weekly seminar to discuss ongoing projects and related readings, and to exercise skills. At the end of term, every student submits for evaluation a major written product prepared for a designated clinic client.
Environmental Law Centre Clinic Intensive: Problem Solving
LAW386B
Law (LAW)
Students receive training in negotiation, collaborative project delivery, and workshop facilitation, and undertake specialized tutorials tailored to urban and rural sustainability with a view to resolving environmental disputes. Students undertake sustained engagement with cases, including litigation, and clients.
Environmental Law Centre Clinic Intensive: Legal Skills & Sustainability
LAW386A
Law (LAW)
Intensive public interest environmental law clinical program in which students are supervised as they assist conservation, community and First Nations clients with legal representation, advocacy services and advice. Students receive training in client interviewing and counseling, file management, professional responsibility and litigation practice, and are introduced to a variety of sustainability law topics.

Social Sciences

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
The Biology behind the News
BIOL351
Biology (BIOL)
An examination of the biological science that bears on current environmental, social, ethical and political issues. Emphasis on how an understanding of the science might inform decision-making by individuals and groups.
Principles of Ecology
BIOL215
Biology (BIOL)
An introduction to factors controlling the distribution and abundance of plants and animals. Physical environments of organisms; biotic environments and interactions among species; factors influencing population growth; behavioural ecology; community ecology; succession; trophic levels and energy flow, island biogeography; biodiversity; human impact on global ecology; conservation ecology.
Paleoecology and Environmental Change
BIOL457
Biology (BIOL)
Fundamental principles of paleoecology with emphasis on species, community and ecosystem responses to environmental change over the past 2 million years. Topics include: using fossil remains to infer ecological dynamics and climate change since the last glaciation; ice age megafaunal extinctions; role of paleoecology in conservation.
Conservation Biology
BIOL370
Biology (BIOL)
Diversity of organisms, functioning of ecosystems, and the impact of human activities on these. Topics include the nature of biological diversity; extinction and its cause; habitat alteration and fragmentation; effects of exotic species; economic and ethical considerations; practical applications and analytical tools; and legal frameworks for conserving species and habitats.
Forest Ecology
BIOL418
Biology (BIOL)
Structure and function of forest ecosystems at the tree, stand and landscape scale, including: effects of the environment upon plant abundance, distribution and diversity; nutrient, carbon and water cycles; population and community ecology; disturbance; forest conservation; climate change and global forests.
Atmospheric Sciences
EOS340
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Introduction to the dynamic and thermodynamic processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Emphasis on energy and temperature; cloud and precipitation processes; winds and weather systems; ocean-atmosphere interaction; El Nino; and past, present and future climates.
The Dynamic Earth
EOS120
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Internal and external processes that shape the Earth and its landscapes. Nature of tectonic forces, earthquakes, volcanoes, rocks and minerals, and mountain building. Processes of erosion, sediment transport and deposition and glaciation. Global water cycle and hydrological processes. Geologic record of past environmental change and its impact on life. Natural resources, natural hazards and sustainability.
Physical Oceanography
EOS431
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Observations and theories explaining the wind- and buoyancy-driven circulations of the ocean. Topics include: wind-forced currents; ocean-scale gyres; coastal circulation; conservation of dynamical tracers; mixing, potential energy and the resulting basin-scale overturning circulations; waves.
Introductory Chemical Oceanography
EOS312
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
An introduction to the sources, distribution, and transformations of chemical constituents of the ocean, and their relation to biological, chemical, geological, and physical processes. Topics include: controls on average concentration of chemicals in the ocean; vertical and horizontal distributions of ocean constituents; air-sea interactions; production, export, and remineralization of organic matter; the ocean carbon cycle; human-induced changes; stable isotopes and trace elements.
Understanding the Oceans
EOS350
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Focuses on a small set of ocean topics involving human impacts on the ocean that are of particular relevance to society. Topics considered may include pollution, overfishing, ocean acidification, marine conservation, and coastal modification.
Natural Hazard
EOS170
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
An overview of natural hazards including earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, landslides, flooding, extreme weather, wildfires and space hazards. Particular attention is given to hazards affecting southwestern British Columbia, hazards related to climate change, and important historic natural disasters. This is an introductory-level course that does not require a science/math background.
Earth System Evolution
EOS260
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Introduces the inherently interdisciplinary field of "Earth System Science" by studying how Earth has evolved throughout its history. Focus is on processes which link components of the Earth system and feedbacks which may alternately keep conditions on Earth stable or cause major change. The course includes study of some major events in Earth history (examples may include snowball Earth, mass extinctions, superplume events).
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
EOS403
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Organic matter is studied from its formation (primary production) through its transformation and destruction during transport, depositional, and diagenetic remineralization processes. Global carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulphur cycles are discussed. Emphasis is placed on describing the fluxes of nutrients and other major compounds within and across the interface of soils, and the sedimentary and water columns.
Biological Oceanography
EOS311
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
An introduction to the ways in which physical, chemical and biological processes interact to regulate structure and productivity of marine ecosystems. Lectures focus primarily on planktonic ecosystems. Participation in a one-day oceanographic cruise is required.
Sedimentary Geology
EOS201
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
The physical, chemical and biological nature of sediments at sea and on land. The process of sediment transport, deposition and diagenesis. The origin and internal stratigraphy of sedimentary basins in the context of plate tectonics. The sedimentary record as used to reconstruct past climates, geographies, and earth and ocean dynamics. The geological evolution of western Canada as deduced from its stratigraphic record.
The Climate System
EOS433
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Studies of the Earth's climate require an understanding of the intimate links between the hydrosphere, atmosphere, cryosphere and biosphere. Basic theories of the dynamics of ocean and atmosphere. The physics and biogeochemistry of coupled models are examined with emphasis on simple intuition-building mathematical models as well as discussion of large computer models.
Quaternary Geology
EOS450
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
The methods and theory of Quaternary research, stressing the processes of interaction between the geosphere and biosphere. Topics include dating methods, paleoenvironmental studies, glaciation and global change, geological hazards, interdisciplinary research and applied studies, particularly the influence for engineering design.
Descriptive Physical Oceanography
EOS314
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
An introduction to the geography of Earth's fluid ocean and the physics that govern it. Topics include fundamental physical variables and their distribution, air/sea interaction, water masses and their formation, large-scale ocean dynamics, equatorial and coastal physical oceanography, and interactions between physical, chemical, and biological processes in the ocean. Participation in a single-day oceanographic cruise is expected.
Oceans and Atmosphere
EOS110
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Origin and structure of the oceans and atmosphere. Dynamic processes that drive ocean and atmosphere circulation, weather patterns and global climate change. The coastal ocean, marine ecosystems, nutrient and carbon cycles, human influences on ocean environments, marine resources and sustainability.
Paleobiology
EOS330
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Processes and patterns in the evolution of life through time: extinction, evolution and diversification as recognized from the fossil record. Major events in the history of life. The relationship of biotas to depositional systems: paleoecology, biostratigraphy and paleobiogeography. The major groups of microfossils and invertebrates are studied with emphasis on their applications in Earth Sciences. Laboratories and field trips provide illustrative fossil examples.
Earth System Science
EOS460
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
An examination of the interrelationships between the complex systems operating in the solid Earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere; methods of systems analysis for the planet; modelling of global processes.
Climate and Society
EOS365
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
A survey of the climate system and its interaction with past, present and future societies. Topics include: climate change and the onset of agriculture/domestication, climate change and the rise and fall of early civilizations, the anthropocene and global warming. The interplay between science, media, public relations and public policy is also addressed.
Earth System Modelling
EOS225
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
An introduction to the construction, analysis and interpretation of quantitative models of the Earth System and its components, with a particular emphasis on the use of computers in scientific problem solving. Both process models and statistical models are discussed. Topics may include simple models of mountain building, reaction kinetics, global energy balance, ecosystem dynamics, the geothermal gradient.
Energy Resources
EOS422
Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS)
Discusses the Earth's major economic natural energy resources. Focuses on conventional oil and gas, coal, CBM and tar sands, including modes of formation, accumulation and recovery, along with the mechanisms of migration and trapping. Canadian examples of petroleum systems and basin modelling augment the material. To a lesser degree, other energy sources are looked at, such as nuclear fuels, solar, hydrogen, geothermal, biogas, wind and tidal, as well as related socio-economic-environmental issues.
Fluid Mechanics
PHYS 426
PHysics (PHYS)
Flow kinematics, vorticity, the Navier-Stokes equations, Bernoulli's theorem, irrotational flow, viscous flow, dynamic similarity. Application to aerodynamics, water waves, low Reynolds number (very viscous) flow and other selected topics.
Thermodynamics
PHYS 317
PHysics (PHYS)
Ideal gas laws. Laws of Thermodynamics. Temperature and entropy. Thermodynamic potentials. Heat engines. Introductory statistical physics.
Atmospheric Sciences
PHYS340
Physics (PHYS)
Introduction to the dynamic and thermodynamic processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Emphasis on energy and temperature; cloud and precipitation processes; winds and weather systems; ocean-atmosphere interaction; El Nino; and past, present and future climates.
Title
Course
Department
Description
Globalization, Health, and the Environment
ANTH302
Anthropology (ANTH)
A comparative framework for understanding the relationship between global processes, the environment and health. Topics may include the origin and evolution of infectious diseases with human societies, social and economic inequalities, violence, gender, diet, health policies, technologies, pandemics, climate change, and health care industries. Emphasis on how local experiences of health are linked to global processes via the environment.
Environmental Economics II
ECON481
Economics (ECON)
A detailed treatment of advanced topics in environmental economics. Topics covered vary from year to year, but typically include a selection from the following: property rights and the Coase theorem, risk and uncertainty, sustainability, policy design under asymmetric information, monitoring and enforcement, green consumerism and corporate environmentalism, trade and the environment, climate change and transboundary pollution, mobile source pollution, non-point source pollution, solid waste management, technological change and non-market valuation.
Climate Economics
ECON383
Economics (ECON)
Introduces complex issues related to the interaction between the economy and climate, and simple tools of economics used to analyze climate-related problems. Role of energy and governance in economic development. Use of economic principles to quantify human influence on climate, evaluate the IPCC's emissions scenarios, develop instruments for addressing greenhouse gas emissions reductions, compare competing policies for addressing climatic change, and analyze the prospects of proposed solutions to global warming.
Environmental Economics I
ECON381/ES312
Economics (ECON)
An introduction to the economic analysis of environmental problems. In particular, an examination of policy interventions in cases where market activities result in socially undesirable impacts on the environment. Topics typically include: externalities; pollution control policy; climate change; public goods; time, uncertainty and the environment; and trade and the environment.
The Economy and the Environment
ECON111
Economics (ECON)
Investigates the linkages between economic activity and the environment. Studies the relationships between economic growth, trade, urbanization and the global environment, with a particular focus on urban air pollution, water pollution, hazardous waste, solid waste management, and climate change. Environmental policy design, in both developed and developing countries, is the central unifying theme of the course. The course is non-technical in nature and does not require any background in economics or environmental studies.
Natural Resource Economics I
ECON382
Economics (ECON)
Introduces students to economic issues and public policies specific to the use and management of natural resources. Explores economic principles for the efficient allocation of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources over time. Topics typically include a review of current natural resource issues affecting Canada, with particular focus on British Columbia, and policies for the management of forests, water, mineral, petroleum and marine resources, and the conservation of biological diversity.
Natural Resource Economics II
ECON482
Economics (ECON)
Dynamic optimization as it applies to renewable and non-renewable resources, focusing in particular on dynamic problems related to fishing, logging and mining. Economic principles relating to the governance/regulation of natural resources are also examined.
Climate Change and Biodiversity
ES443
Environmental Studies (ES)
Examines the challenges a changing climate poses for ecology and conservation biology research and management, including ecological restoration. Particular attention is given to reading scientific papers, both those that present biodiversity pattern and process changes, as well as those that present management solutions to climate-driven biodiversity loss.
Power, Difference, and Environmental Politics
ES417
Environmental Studies (ES)
Explores how environmental politics is shaped by and seek to challenge relations of oppression.
Colonization, Nature, and the Making of British Columbia
ES427
Environmental Studies (ES)
Introduces students to the essential concepts and methods used by historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, geographers and others to analyze environmental change from prehistoric to modern times. Explores how cultural encounters between Euro-American and the Indigenous peoples of British Columbia played out on the physical landscape, focusing on the processes of dispossession and repossession that led to the creation of the space that became British Columbia.
Climate and Society
ES365
Environmental Studies (ES)
A survey of the climate system and its interaction with past, present and future societies. Topics include: climate change and the onset of agriculture/domestication, climate change and the rise and fall of early civilizations, the anthropocene and global warming. The interplay between science, media, public relations and public policy is also addressed.
Introduction to Environmental Studies
ES200
Environmental Studies (ES)
Introduction to the symptoms and sources of environmental problems and approaches to resolving them. Global and local food systems are used as a focal lens through which to view and understand human impacts on ecosystems (e.g. climate change, biodiversity loss, deforestation) and how those impacts can be best addressed.
Climate, Energy and Politics
ES405
Environmental Studies (ES)
Focuses on developing the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate how we might reshape energy systems to address the dual challenges of climate change and sustainability.
Ecological Processes
ES240
Environmental Studies (ES)
An introduction to the discipline of ecology with a focus on understanding biotic processes as they relate to contemporary environmental challenges.
Food in Place, Skills for Change
ES409
Environmental Studies (ES)
Develops and puts into action student skills towards a current environmental issue. Training in working with multi-party disputes, First Nations, and non-governmental organizations. Analyzes the role and impact of environmental policy actors.
Visual Ecology, Seeing the Wild
ES408
Environmental Studies (ES)
Explores the terrain of visual media that inform environmental studies in B.C. and internationally. Environmental movements and media campaigns; the visuality of place; art and activism; indigenous new media; representations and relations with non-human animals. Critically examines the politics of looking.
Ethnoecology
ES321
Environmental Studies (ES)
Environmental knowledge systems of indigenous and other local peoples are increasingly recognized as having relevance in understanding and documenting biological diversity and conservation and in undertaking ecological restoration. The different aspects of local and traditional ecological knowledge and their relationships to western academic knowledge are reviewed and the issues and requirements for applying local knowledge in environmental sustainability are explored.
Past, Present, and Future Ecologies
ES341
Environmental Studies (ES)
Explores how ideas and practices about ecosystems and nature more generally have come to be in the early 21st century, how they are manifest in the present, and what trends will shape the future. Rapid environmental, ecological and cultural changes are forcing a reconsideration of how we understand nature and natural processes, and how to intervene responsibly in ecosystems. Themes are drawn from landscape and community ecology, systems ecology, ethnoecology, restoration ecology, and political ecology.
Changing Nature
ES445
Environmental Studies (ES)
Discusses responsible intervention in ecosystems undergoing rapid change, covering a wide range of contemporary issues from barcoding biodiversity to rewilding, all with the aim of pushing against boundaries of received knowledge about preservation, conservation and restoration of nature.
Deep Roots, Trajectories of Environmental Thought
ES404
Environmental Studies (ES)
Examines classic works and persistent themes in North American environmental thought. A study of primary source material and texts by writers such as Thoreau, Austin, Muir, Pinchot, Leopold, Carson, Ellul, Schumacher, Berry and Shiva.
Principles and Concepts of Ecological Restoration
ER311
Environmental Studies (ES)
An examination of how effective restoration depends on both ecological and cultural awareness, including the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of ecosystems from local to global scales; the impacts of human-induced change; the philosophical and ethical context for good restoration; the need for and significance of community involvement; the legal and policy frameworks that direct and influence restoration activities; and the importance of understanding essential ecosystem characteristics in restoration.
Traditional Systems of Land and Resource Management
ER326
Environmental Studies (ES)
The role of traditional ecological knowledge in the understanding and documentation of the biodiversity of natural systems and their restoration. Examination of how restoration strategies can benefit from the close relationship of Indigenous Peoples to their local environments, and from their knowledge of plants and animals, their habitats and ecological interrelationships, as well as from traditional land and resource management strategies.
Environmental Evidence in a Post-truth Era
ES399
Environmental Studies (ES)
Builds the skills necessary to critically assess environmental issues and research. Emphasis is placed on critical assessment of evidence of all kinds, grounded in an understanding of quantitative and qualitative methodological considerations. Students evaluate a wide variety of approaches to understanding and addressing real-world environmental challenges, and work towards producing their own compelling and comprehensive analysis of these challenges.
Capitalism, Justice and Sustainability
ES302
Environmental Studies (ES)
Examines how the global capitalist economy is transforming ecosystems, and how social and environmental challenges are in turn beginning to transform capitalism. Economic alternatives are examined in local and global contexts (e.g. the social economy, steady state economies and Indigenous economic practices).
Political Ecology
ES301
Environmental Studies (ES)
An introduction to the various socio-political and philosophical issues associated with the concept of a sustainable society. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the complex relationships between social and biophysical systems. Examines how communities and environments are being impacted by the globalization of economies and cultures, technologies and ideologies, as well as responses from a variety of local, non-governmental and international agencies.
Soil Conservation and Restoration
ER334
Environmental Studies (ES)
Physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soils and their relationship to restoration. Soil fertility; importance of soil flora and fauna, especially mycorrhizae. Comparison of characteristics of undisturbed soils. Types of soil disturbance in agriculture, forestry, mining and urban environments; soil restoration strategies; planning pre- and post-disturbance.
Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
ER313/ES348
Environmental Studies (ES)
Study of biological organisms and ecosystems with particular reference to mechanisms of change and human impacts on the environment. Focuses on: biodiversity (definition, assessment methods, loss, and evaluation); population biology (concepts and research methods); habitat loss; species extinction; exotic species and their impacts; and possibilities for human intervention in alleviating trends in species loss and ecosystem degradation.
Advanced Studies in Weather and Climate
GEOG484
Geography (GEOG)
Detailed examination of atmospheric structures and processes underlying weather and climate. Practical work focuses on analysis of vertical stability and utilizing computer weather model data.
Introduction to Biogeography
GEOG274
Geography (GEOG)
Examines the relationships among organisms - principally plants and animals - and their environment, emphasizing their distributions across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Examines basic ecological and evolutionary concepts affecting biogeographic processes of dispersal, speciation and extinction; how patterns of biodiversity change over space and time from early earth history to the contemporary environment; the nature of changing biotic distributions with increasing human impacts and global change.
Field Studies in Sustainable Communities
GEOG317
Geography (GEOG)
The challenges and opportunities for promoting resilient, inclusive, equitable and sustainable communities are explored through practical and experiential learning. A field trip fee may be applied.
Global Environment Change and Human Response
GEOG314
Geography (GEOG)
Based on four components: global environmental change; sustainable development; biodiversity; and population impoverishment and environmental degradation. Lectures and discussion emphasize the causes of global change, the present and expected impacts on natural and social systems, and response strategies that have been proposed or enacted.
Environment, Society and Sustainability
GEOG101A
Geography (GEOG)
Introduction to the functioning of the biosphere, the ways in which humans alter natural processes, environmental consequences of these alterations and the implications for sustainability. Topics include: energy flows, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, pollution, global change, water resources, biodiversity, endangered species, protected areas, agriculture and food, forestry, marine resources, poverty and development and different worldviews. Potential for a sustainable society is discussed.
Introduction to Physical Geography
GEOG103
Geography (GEOG)
Introduces the science of Physical Geography using an earth-systems approach. Course themes include global climates and climate change, hydrology and water resources, geomorphology and natural hazards, and biogeography; with focus on how geographic sciences are applied to address real world issues.
Sustainable Cities
GEOG406
Geography (GEOG)
Explores the opportunities and challenges of planning ecologically, socially and environmentally just cities.
Introduction to Climatology and Hydrology
GEOG272
Geography (GEOG)
An investigation of the fundamental processes controlling climate and hydrology. Explores various factors and interactions that determine the spatial and temporal variations of individual climate elements. Special attention is given to the mutual interaction of climate with the Earth's surface and the role that ground surface type or cover plays in moderating local climate and hydrology.
Environment and Sustainability in Practice
GEOG450
Geography (GEOG)
Examines the decision making theory and real world processes associated with resources management at the policy and field levels. Case studies used to illustrate decision making behaviour, from conflict to co-operation. Simulation sessions, field trip and field methods review.
Applied Climatology
GEOG373
Geography (GEOG)
A study of the application of physical principles to practical problems in climatology and the reciprocal interaction between climate and human activities. Topics include: urban effects on climate; air pollution; human bioclimatology; agricultural climatology; and methods of microclimatic modification.
Introduction to Environmental Management
GEOG209
Geography (GEOG)
Introduces students to the conceptual foundations of resource and environmental management by emphasizing geographic aspects of resource systems within environmental, social, economic, and policy frameworks. Using a variety of examples, it examines strategies and tools such as adaptive management approaches, ecosystem-based management, impact assessment, and conflict resolution.
Environmental Impact Assessment
GEOG301
Geography (GEOG)
An introduction to the objectives, philosophy, concepts, methods and social implications of environmental impact assessment (EIA). A critical examination of EIA as an analytical tool in the context of resource management and public policy is undertaken. Examples are drawn from B.C., Canada and other countries.
Health, Environment and Community
GEOG346
Geography (GEOG)
Examines the dynamics and linkages between health and the environment at the micro scale of individuals to the macro scale of communities and nations. Definitions of health, wellness and well-being, as well as healthy communities; focusing on the range of factors, conditions and determinants that make people and place healthy or unhealthy.
Canadian Environmental Politics
POLI357
Political Science (POLI)
An examination of political factors shaping development and implementation of Canadian environmental policy.
Topics in Environmental Politics
POLI458
Political Science (POLI)
A seminar course covering examination of political factors shaping responses to selected global environmental issues.
Environmental Psychology
PSYC325
Psychology (PSYC)
Human interaction with the physical environment from a psychological perspective. Topics include environmental perception, cognition, and assessment; personality and environment; the dynamics of social space; the effects of temperature, sound, light and spatial arrangements in neighborhoods, homes, schools and workplaces; mutual influences of individuals and the natural environment, the design of buildings, and resource management.
Advanced Environmental Psychology
PSYC425
Psychology (PSYC)
An in-depth analysis of how people's thoughts, feelings, and interactions influence and are influenced by the built and natural environment.
Environmental Psychology of the Built Environment
PSYC555A
Psychology (PSYC)
Seminar review of theory and research in the environmental psychology of the built environment. The topics may include social design of buildings, human behaviour as it is related to built environments, environmental perception and cognition, and person-environment transactions in residences, neighborhoods, schools, workplaces, retail stores, and public spaces.
The Psychology of Nature, Sustainability, and Climate Change
PSYC555B
Psychology (PSYC)
Seminar review of theory and research in the environmental psychology of natural world. The topics may include sustainability-related behaviour, psychological restoration from nature, resource management, sustainability, and the psychological aspects of climate change.
Issues in Environmental Sociology and Climate Change
SOCI437
Sociology (SOCI)
In-depth examination of sociological explanations of the causes and social consequences of environmental degradation and climate change with a focus on solutions and alternatives. Topics may include: social movements around environmental justice, climate change and climate justice, alternative and diverse economies including food sovereignty, "fair trade" and ethical consumption, and ecological feminisms.
Current Issues in Ecology, Global Sociology and Social Movements
SOCI 535
Sociology (SOCI)
A seminar exploring a range of contemporary issues pertaining to ecology, global sociology and social movements. Content is informed by faculty members' current research and varies from year to year.
Ecology, Society, and Global Change
SOCI 207
Sociology (SOCI)
Examines socio-ecological relationships between human societies and the rest of the natural world. Surveys key concepts and theories of environmental problems, with a focus on power, environmental inequalities, and social movements to realize justice and sustainability at local and global scales.
Sociology of Food and Eating
SOCI 388
Sociology (SOCI)
Examines what you eat and where it comes from through various lenses including gender, justice, power, animal-rights and ecology. The examination moves beyond criticism and explores progressive social movements that are changing how we see food.

Continuing Studies

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
Climate Change and the Ocean
n/a
Continuing Studies
As our planet warms, the global ocean is feeling it. Marine heat waves and coral bleaching events are on the increase while Arctic sea ice shrinks and oxygen levels decline. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to climate change are also
Carbon Reduction Programs and Policies
n/a
Continuing Studies
We will look at other greenhouse gas reduction policies, such as low carbon fuel standards, vehicle carbon emission standards or subsidy programs for building upgrades and clean emission vehicle purchases. We will examine why such policies are necessary i
Climate Plans
n/a
Continuing Studies
We will focus on how to assess the robustness and completeness of climate plans. This session will examine federal and selected provincial climate plans, looking at plan components such as greenhouse gas targets, baselines, actions and carbon accounting.
Carbon Pricing
n/a
Continuing Studies
This session is devoted to a centrally important climate reduction strategy, carbon pricing. It will compare the British Columbia carbon tax with the federal and other carbon pricing schemes. Different design choices will be critically examined, including
Understanding Climate Science
n/a
Continuing Studies
Climate change has now become a climate crisis. Increase your knowledge by joining us to learn about how the natural greenhouse effect works and how humans are enhancing this effect, resulting in a warming world. We will also explore how a warming world is changing the world's climates, resulting in various impacts (e.g. feedback loops that are accelerating change, irreversible tipping points, wildfires growing bigger) and how humans are being forced to adapt to these changes.
Climate Crisis Risks
n/a
Continuing Studies
The climate crisis presents real risks to the biosphere as a whole, including us humans. In this course we will investigate how a warming world is changing climates, but also changing weather events - especially extreme weather events

Interdisciplinary

 
Title
Course
Department
Description
Introduction to Human Dimensions of Climate Change
HDCC200
Human Dimensions of Climate Change (HDCC)
An introduction to understanding and mitigating the impacts of climate change. After a basic introduction to the physical nature of climate change, the focus turns to impacts on humans in political, economic, sociological, and psychological terms.
Experiential Learning
HDCC490
Human Dimensions of Climate Change (HDCC)
Organized around opportunities for community engagement and experiential learning in an applied situation. Students work with an instructor to identify issues to be explored and what course assessment methods will be used before the experiential learning
Special Topics in the Human Dimensions of Climate Change
HDCC390
Human Dimensions of Climate Change (HDCC)
An interdisciplinary investigation of a selected topic that emerges from the study of the human dimensions of climate change.
Seminar on Human Dimensions of Climate Change
HDCC400
Human Dimensions of Climate Change (HDCC)
Presentations by instructors, guest lecturers and students reinforce and extend knowledge of, and perspectives on, the impacts of climate change on humans. Strategies for mitigating the impacts are also considered.
Climate Change for Social Transformation
HDCC300
Human Dimensions of Climate Change (HDCC)
An opportunity for critical engagement with climate change as physical transformation, cultural object and incitement to social transformation. This interdisciplinary course approaches climate change as complex phenomena.

Are we missing a course that should be on the list? Email us!

Untitled-1.png