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FACULTY INVENTORY

Looking for a faculty member working on climate related issues at UVic? Explore our list of faculty members from nine faculties and 30 departments across campus who are conducting teaching or research directly on indirectly related to climate solutions, climate science or climate awareness. 

Faculty members are sorted by their home faculty. You can click on the boxes below to go directly to the listing by faculty.

Clicking on each profile will bring you to their UVic profile or website.

 

Business

Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Gustavson School of Business
Adel Guitouni
Associate Professor
sustainable value/supply chains; responsible decision making; multiple criteria decision analysis; decision support systems; management sciences; healthcare resource management
Dr. Guitouni's research focuses on sustainable supply chain management and responsible decision making in business management and decision analysis. Under sustainable supply chain management, he has a research project funded by the National Research Council to investigate the digitization of sustainable supply chain with application in the agri-food business. In collaboration with Dr. Majerbi and Dr. Brandl, he is exploring the concept of sustainability upgrading along global value chains. He is also leading the BC investigation on the response of health supply chain to COVID-19. His responsible decision making research portfolio incules an application for an NSERC Discovery grant to investigate distributed and responsible decision making along global co-production networks. He bridges technology and management to develop decision support tools for sustainable management and responsible decision making in organization.
Gustavson School of Business
Basma Majerbi
Associate Professor
Sustainable finance; Climate risk; Impact investing; International finance Financial systems and economic development; Financial stability
Dr. Majerbi's early research was in asset pricing, international finance, foreign exchange risk management and financial crises. More recently, she moved to research in sustainable finance with a focus on impact investing and climate-related financial risks; she's currently working on a project funded by SSHRC on "Financial system diversity, macro-financial stability and climate change risk" and another funded by PICS on "Integrating Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation into Finance and Investments". She also leads the development of VI3Hub, a multistaholder platform funded by the UVic SF Impact Fund and dedicated to promoting investments in climate solutions. She is a member of the Climate Solutions Navigator working group and the Impact Investing working group at UVic.
Gustavson School of Business
Brock Smith
Professor
Value creation. Entrepreneurial Cognition. Entrepreneurial Networks, Social Capital & Embeddness, Entrepreneurial Use of Digital Networks. Entrepreneurial Identity.
Dr. Smith's work focuses on the general question 'How does (should) value get created?' He has examined this question in many contexts, but mainly with a focus on entrepreneurs, their cognitive processes, their use of online and offline networks, their identity, and most recently how entrepreneurs transition from employees to founders. With respect to sustainability, he has one publication that examines non-financial goals and outcomes of entrepreneurs. Another manuscript close to being ready for submission examines entrepreneurs identity including an examination of communitarian and missionary entrepreneurs who often have social and sustainable orientations.
Gustavson School of Business
Christian Van Buskirk
Assistant Teaching Professor
sustainable marketing, sustainable curriculum and teaching, sustainable innovation
Christian Van Buskirk incorporates sustainability concepts and frameworks into marketing curriclum at both the undergraduate and graduate level courses, focusing on application via student group projects.
Gustavson School of Business
David Dunne
Professor
Innovation, design thinking
Dr. Dunne led the introduction and developoment of the Gustavson MBA in Sustainable Innovation. He teaches the Innovation and Design course in this program and the COM program, in which students complete a project related to sustainability using design methods. He is past Board Chair and currently a Board member and volunteer with Academics Without Borders, an NGO dedicated to supporting higher education in developing countries. In this capacity, he has served as a volunteer in a public health school in Kathmandu, Nepal, and is leading the development of an industry immersion program for STEM graduates in several African countries.
Gustavson School of Business
Douglas Stuart
Assistant Teaching Professor
sustainable development; income tax and sustainable development; supply chains; financial risk resulting from climate change
Douglas Stuart is a Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA, CA) that has provided financial reporting and assurance services to a variety of clients in the IT, government, and transportation sectors. He teaches management finance, accounting and general management and is interested in a variety of business disciplines including sustainability, corporate finance, and taxation.
Gustavson School of Business
Heather Ranson
Assistant Teaching Professor; Associate Director, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation (CSSI)
sustainable development goals; sustainability curriculum and teaching; sustainability and business
Heather Ranson is the interim director of the Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation (CSSI), and strengthens current teaching in the school by assisting professors in developing additional expertise in sustainability so that it becomes a strong theme throughout Gustavson's course offerings.
Gustavson School of Business
Jie Zhang
Associate Professor
service coproduction; triad and system; services for older adults; professional services; sustainable service operations
Dr. Zhang researches theories and practices in service research, technology and knowledge management, and sustainable development. She uses empirical research tools to investigate the value co-creation interactions (i.e., service coproduction) among a network of customers and their service providers in contexts such as hospitality, higher education, and services for older adults.
Gustavson School of Business
Matt Murphy
Associate Professor
cross-sector collaboration; stakeholder relationships; business and human rights; social & community-based entrepreneurship; community-based participatory action research with First Nations
Dr. Murphy is an associate professor of sustainability and strategy whose research is focused on: stakeholder relationships related to conflict and collaboration; community-based sustainable development efforts in the context of First Nations; evaluating and monitoring the socio-cultural fit and impact of economic development projects; and documentary films about the efforts of communities on different continents that are working towards food sovereignty.
Gustavson School of Business
Michael King
Associate Professor
Sustainable Finance; Climate Risk; Fintech; Banking; International Finance.
Dr. King is moving into sustainable finance with a focus on climate scenarios, risk modeling and valuation. He is returning to research on carbon pricing, an area where he published in 2008. He is working on impact investing, and is on UVic Treasury's thematic impact taskforce and has co-authored a case on Raven Indigenous Capital Partners. His continuing research on fintech considers how technology can promote financial inclusion.
Gustavson School of Business
Monika Winn
Professor Emerita
business initiatives to strengthen ecosystems and biodiversity; climate change impacts on business; managing stakeholder conflicts and social issues; sustainability strategy and sustainable value creation
Dr. Winn is an international leader in socially and environmentally sustainable business strategies, such as adaptation to the physical impacts of climate change, and has taken a leadership role in helping sustainability and social responsibility become an integral part of the Gustavson culture. She teaches business strategy with the goal of helping to understand both the risks to business when ecosystems are degraded, the strategic opportunities for proactive businesses, and to learn to incorporate sustainability methodology into organizational strategy and culture.
Gustavson School of Business
Ravee Chittoor
Associate Professor
Joint effects of competitive strategies and stakeholder orientation on firm performance; CSR in family firms; Heterogeneity in ESG performance among international firms; natural and sustainable farming
Dr. Chittoor teaches and conducts research in the areas of strategy and international business. He has research expertise in emerging markets, emerging market multinationals, family firms and sustainability orientation of firms.
Gustavson School of Business
Ricardo Flores
Assistant Professor
organization theory & sustainability; public sustainable procurement, responsible leadership training, values, innovation
Dr. Flores teaches and researches in the area of organization theory and sustainability. Dr. Flores' research explores how institutions, society and organization leaders interact (e.g., responsible leadership, ESG/SDGs embbeddeness in firms' strategies, local government sustainability initiatives, acelerators' role in embedding sustainability into new ventures, etc.). Additionally, in collaboration with Dr. Kristen Brandl, Dr. Flores is leading the Canadian leg of the Sustainability Procurement Research Initiative (a global research effort studying the procurement decisions of cities and municipalities in different countries).
Gustavson School of Business
Rick Cotton
Associate Professor
career success, networks, talent management, sutainable careers, cross-cultural management
Dr. Cotton's research interests include analytics and team chemistry with a focus on how human, social and positive psychological capital foster individual and collective success in different occupational and country contexts. He looks at how individuals survive and thrive in unique occupations from correctional officers to female Australian miners to HR professionals who have laid off thousands of employees to baseball hall of famers and serial entrepreneurs.
Gustavson School of Business
Sara R. S. T. A. Elias
Assistant Professor
Arts entrepreneurship; aesthetics in organizations and entrepreneurship; entrepreneurship as practice; entrepreneurial imagining; creative entrepreneurial processes; qualitative methodologies
Dr. Elias researches and teaches in the areas of entrepreneurship, organizational aesthetics, and qualitative methodologies. Her current research focuses on how arts entrepreneurs co-create aesthetic value with their customers while developing artistic and innovative products, the role of resilience and imagination in accomplishing entrepreneurial projects that contribute to social and rural development, and the entrepreneurial practices involved in sustaining "unconventional" careers. Her academic interests stem from her background in business, engineering, and music, as well as from her experience as an entrepreneur, music manager, performing artist, and managing director of Associação CICO, an international center for promoting the performing arts, headquartered in Portugal.
Gustavson School of Business
Simon Pek
Assistant Professor
sustainability and organization theory; cultural, social and environmental sustainability; risk and safety management;
Dr. Pek teaches and researches in the area of sustainability and organization theory. Dr. Pek's primary research explores how organizations and the individuals within them embed social and environmental sustainability into their cultures, strategies, and daily operations.
Gustavson School of Business
Stacey Fitzsimmons
Associate Professor
Bicultural and multicultural individuals in the workplace International management Immigrant employees Diversity and inclusion
Dr. Fitzsimmons' research helps individuals and organizations realize the strengths of a diverse workforce. Her research goal is to improve the way people work with others across differences. For example, she recently published an intersectional analysis of the salary gaps that accrue to the combination of immigrant generation, gender, race and mother tongue. She is also working on an assessment of equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) research in international business. One of her current research projects is a longitudinal case study of the integration of Syrian refugee employees in Germany.
Gustavson School of Business
Sudhir Nair
Associate Professor
Strategy; International Business; Professional Service Firms; Migration; Newcomers (migrants / immigrants / refugees)
Sudhir’s research interests coalesce around international strategy. He is particularly interested in the reasons and consequences for individuals or businesses crossing organizational or geographic boundaries. More recently, he has been researching the newcomer (immigrant and refugee) space in Canada from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Gustavson School of Business
Wade Danis
Professor
International Business
Dr. Wade Danis concentrates his research and teaching on global strategic management, international comparative management, and international entrepreneurship, particularly in the context of emerging economies. His entrepreneurship interests focus on those firms that started in an international context, often described as “born global” firms, and on how and why entrepreneurial activities differ across national contexts.

Education

 
Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Curriculum and Instruction
Jason Price
Associate Professor
teacher and educational leadership preparation; Indigenous/countercultural education; education for ecological restoration; education for the advancement of human rights and happiness; educational policy and governance; peace education; governance simulations and youth leadership.
Dr. Price is interested in teacher and educational leadership preparation, Indigenous/countercultural education, education for ecological restoration, education for the advancement of human rights and happiness, educational policy and governance, Peace education, governance simulations and youth leadership.
Curriculum and Instruction
Jodi Streelasky
Assistant Professor
outdoor & environmental education; Indigenous knowledge; early childhood education; literacy & multimodality; family & community literacies; international education;
Dr. Streelasky's teaching and research focuses on early childhood education, literacy & multimodality, family & community Literacies, international education, outdoor & environmental education, Indigenous knowledge.
Curriculum and Instruction
Todd Milford
Associate Professor and Interim Department Chair
teacher preparation for elementary education; science education; educational measurement; quantitative methods; research methods.
Dr. Milford is a member of the Climate Solutions Navigator, his teaching and research interests include teacher preparation for elementary education, science education, educational measurement, quantitative methods and research methods.
Indigenous Education
Carmen Rodriguez de France
Assistant Professor
Indigenous Education Diversity and Social Justice Second Language Acquisition Indigenous Early Childhood Education Teacher Education Arts-Based and Place-Based Education Formal and Non-Formal Education Community-Engaged Scholarship
Carmen has been working in the field of education for 34 years. As a former school teacher, she understands the importance of developing and exploring approaches to teaching and leaning as a tool to advance critical thinking. Through her participation in a variety of community-based initiatives in schools, recreational centres, art galleries, and other spaces for learning, Carmen's work with in-service and pre-service teachers focuses on creating awareness to better understand, appreciate, and learn from the histories and storeis of the Indigenous people of Canada and other parts of the World. Carmen's research is always motivated by her own interest to be a life long learner and promote diversity and social justice. Consequently, her work involves teaches, students, and other stakeholders within educational settings.
Indigenous Education
Edosdi (Judy Thompson)
Associate Professor
Indigenous language revitalization and reclamation; Indigenous Language Education; Indigenous research methodologies and community-based research.
Edōsdi is a trained school teacher and has taught students of all ages, from children to Elders, in a wide range of courses, from First Nations Studies, Education, Math, Geography, and Physics. Edōsdi provides students with opportunities to work with and learn from Elders and community members and to step outside the confines of the classroom with hands-on experiential learning. She also brings community members and scholars into the classroom, either in person or via technology.
Indigenous Education
Jean-Paul Restoule
Chair & Professor
Indigenous Education Indigenous Worldviews Online Learning Indigenous Research Teacher Education Indigenous Knowledge Indigenous Pedagogy Indigenous Student Success
Jean-Paul Restoule is an Anishinaabe scholar and educator. He is concerned with bringing Indigenous worldviews to a wide audience and infusing Indigenous perspectives into mainstream practice. He is currently leading a study on how to centre Indigenous pedagogy and ways of knowing and being in online learning environments. Jean-Paul is also investigating what motivates educators to incorporate Indigenous perspectives in their teaching practice and how teacher candidates and new teachers can best develop the knowledges, confidence and motivation to meaningfully include Indigenous knoledges and pedagogies in their classrooms.
Indigenous Education
Onowa McIvor
Associate Professor
Indigenous Education Diversity and Social Justice Second Language Acquisition Indigenous Early Childhood Education Teacher Education Arts-Based and Place-Based Education Formal and Non-Formal Education Community-Engaged Scholarship
Onowa McIvor is maskiko-nehiyaw (Swampy Cree) and Scottish-Canadian. Her nehiyaw family is from Norway House and Cross Lake in northern Manitoba. She is a grateful visitor in SENĆOŦEN and Lekwungen speaking territories. As an Associate Professor in the Department of Indigenous Education at the University of Victoria, Onowa co-leads a six-year SSHRC Partnership Grant co-PIs together with Dr. Peter Jacobs, and co-PIs Trish Rosborough, Charlotte Loppie, and Jessica Ball, and in collaboration with nine Indigenous community Partners across Canada. The essence of the work together focuses on working to understand and enhance Indigenous adults’ contributions to reviving Indigenous languages in Canada. The NEȾOLṈEW̱: ‘one mind, one people’ project aims to deepen the understanding of best practices of adult Indigenous language learning (AILL), how adult Indigenous learners contribute to passing on their language to others in their communities and families, in addition to how language is linked to health and well-being. The Partnership is also developing a nation-wide Environmental Scan, documenting AILL and language revitalization efforts in Canada.

Engineering

 
Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Civil Engineering
Caetano Dorea
Associate Professor
water and wastewater treatment; biological treatment processes; humanitarian emergency water supply and sanitation technologies; treatment technologies
Dr. Dorea's research interests and expertise are at the crossroads of environmental and public health engineering. This includes the development and evaluation of water and sanitation/wastewater technologies, field- and operator-appropriate water/wastewater/ faecal sludge quality analytical methods, and functional ecology characterization of biological treatment systems for safeguarding the health of the public and the environment.
Civil Engineering
Christopher Kennedy
Professor and Chair
sustainable cities and infrastructure; industrial ecology; climate solutions; climate change mitigation; low carbon electrification; urban metabolism; greenhouse gas emissions; global cities
Dr. Kennedy applies principles of Industrial Ecology to challenges of developing sustainable cities and global infrastructure systems. Much of his work has involved the study of urban metabolism (the energy and material flows through cities) which underlies greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental impacts of cites. He also draws upon qualifications in Civil Engineering, Economics and Business to advise on policies and planning for sustainable infrastructure in Canada, China, Saudi Arabia, UAE, and the UK, as well as the World Bank, Ontario Ministry of Finance, and others. Some of his current projects are: electric cities (using low-carbon power sources), global infrastructure (sustainable infrastructure systems), metabolism of megacities, greenhouse gas emissions from global cities, mobilising investment in low carbon, climate resilient infrastructure, urban metabolism, sustainable infrastructure and meighbourhoods.
Civil Engineering
David Bristow
Assistant Professor
resilient infrastructure; building and city systems; sustainable cities; risk management; smart cities; sustainable engineering; climate change adaptation and mitigation; multi-objective decision making; science of cities
Dr. Bristow is interested in how the component parts of our infrastructure systems and cities interact, how we can make them more resilient to shocks and stresses and how we can make them more sustainable. He works on systems planning and decision making in cities engineering through advancement and integration of theory, methodology and practice in systems engineering and risk management via ecological, network, control system, optimization and thermodynamic approaches from first principles. He teaches courses on resilient smart cities and sustainable engineering. His specific research areas of interest include: climate change adaption and mitigation, recovery planning for resilience, multi-objective decision making for resilience and sustainability, and the science of cities.
Civil Engineering
Heather Buckley
Assistant Professor
green chemistry; molecular sensors for water contaminants; safer prevention of fouling
Dr. Buckley is a green chemist and engineering professor that designs tools for better environmental monitoring and strategies for the proactive use of safer alternatives and empowerment of communities and industrial partners towards environmental stewardship and better public health outcomes.
Civil Engineering
Madeleine McPherson
Assistant Professor
sustainable energy systems integration; sustainable and renewable cities; decarbonized energy systems; renewable energy; transport, buildings, electricity, water; optimization and machine intelligence
Dr. McPherson leads the Sustainable Energy Systems Integration and Transitions (SESIT) Group at the University of Victoria, focusing on energy systems integration (transport, buildings, electricity, water). This work involves the development and application of energy system software, designed to address research and policy questions related to variable renewable energy integration, demand response initiatives, utility-scale and behind-the-meter storage technologies, and electric vehicle integration. Her research interests include: representing grid-edge actors and their interaction with the energy system; integrating the transport, power, buildings and water systems; developing a spatially and temporally broad perspective of our energy system; charting Canada?s transition to a decarbonized energy system; and 100% renewable cities.
Civil Engineering
Phalguni Mukhopadhyaya
Associate Professor
energy efficient buildings; high performance thermal insulation; hydrothermal properties of construction materials; moisture management in building envelopes; wood-frame constructions; novel and/or bio-based construction materials; technologies for retrofitting building envelope and structures; climate adaptation; built environment
Dr. Mukhopadhyaya researches various issues related to building envelopes and structures. His current research focus is on heat-air-moisture (HAM) transport through building envelopes and materials and its impact on the durability, energy efficiency and sustainability of the built environment, the application of innovative engineered high performance exterior building envelope materials and systems, laboratory based performance characterization, in-situ performance assessment and applications of numerical modelling tools.
Civil Engineering
Ralph Evins
Assistant Professor
building energy use simulation; energy system optimization; energy hubs; climate adaptation
Dr. Evins is interested in computational problem-solving across the domains of buildings and energy systems. This spans improvements to models and simulations, using optimization approaches like genetic algorithms to explore the space of possible designs, and cutting-edge machine intelligence techniques. His work bridges the building, district and city scales, and is inspired by the principles of systems thinking regarding holistic analysis and interconnectivity. He is also interested in the process of software development in an academic context, and in improving the exchange of knowledge with commercial partners. His research interest are: building and energy system simulation (exploring the performance of new designs and concepts in a rapidly changing techno-economic and climate change context), computational optimization, machine intelligence
Civil Engineering
Tara Troy
Assistant Professor
sustainable water resources; water use and infrastructure; impacts on hydrologic processes; hydrologic impacts of climate change; flood processes; risk assessment; climate adaptation; built environment
Dr. Troy is a hydrologist interested in how climate and humans alter hydrologic processes and what the implications of these alterations are for sustainable water resources. She uses physically-based hydrologic models, stochastic modelling, and data analysis, considering rivers of varying sizes, from a small stream to the Mississippi River. Her research interests are: hydrologic alteration due to water use and the built environment, the impacts of climate change on the water cycle, flood processes and quantifying flood risk.
Civil Engineering
Tom Gleeson
Associate Professor
groundwater footprints and sustainability Mega-scale groundwater systems; groundwater recharge and discharge; fluid flow and geologic structures
Dr. Gleeson is a hydrogeologist interested in groundwater sustainability, regional- to continental-scale groundwater systems, groundwater-surface water interactions and fluid flow around geologic structures. He addresses these interests by integrating disciplines that are not often combined: field methods, numerical modeling, environmental chemistry, structural geology, GIS and policy studies.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Alexandra Branzan Albu
Professor, Graduate advisor
computer vision; computer vision for environmental monitoring; climate change in mountains; pattern recognition; data science; medical imaging; document image analysis; underwater image analysis
Dr. Branzan Albu studies computer vision, a branch of artificial intelligence that deals with visual perception, putting theory to applied use in interdisciplinary collaborative projects. She is currently collaborating with Dr. Higgs's team on the Mountain Legacy Project, housed in the Department of Environmental Studies. Her team works on algorithms for the identification and quantification of changes in mountain landscape images due to climate change. She also collaborates with Ocean Networks Canada on developing algorithms that analyze hours of underwater video footage.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Ashoka K. S. Bhat
Professor
power converters for alternative energy sources; power electronic controls; high-frequency link power conversion-resonant and pulse with modulation; design of electronic circuits for power control
Dr. Bhat's teaching and research focuses on power converters for alternative energy sources, power electronic controls, high-frequency link power conversion-resonant and pulse with modulation, design of electronic circuits for power control.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Daler N. Rakhmatov
Associate Professor
energy-efficient computing; reconfigurable architectures; electronic design automation; dynamically reconfigurable systems; computer algorithms; design space exploration; embedded systems; optimization
Dr. Rakhmatov's research tackles technical challenges associated with enhancing energy efficiency and reusability of battery-powered embedded systems targeting computation-intensive biomedical imaging applications. He takes an application-centric approach, providing for high energy efficiency through sufficient application-driven system specialization, while supporting needed reusability through sufficient application-aware system flexibility, with biomedical ultrasound applications, configurable hardware/software architectures for supporting computation-intensive imaging tasks, predictive analytical models of nonlinear dynamics of the system energy supply and demand, and model-driven configuration algorithms that automatically tune hardware/software components.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Makhsud Saidaminov
Assistant Professor
solar cells; efficient energy harvesting and consumption; X-ray photons; new materials; chemistry and physics of all-inorganic and hybrid organic?inorganic materials
Dr. Saidaminov's research focuses on chemistry and physics of all-inorganic and hybrid organic and inorganic materials for applications in solar cells and optoelectronics. He develops new materials for efficient energy harvesting (solar cells) and consumption (e-ink displays), and integrate them into functional devices. He develops sensitive sensors for X-ray photons, and discovers and designs unseen materials for unseen applications.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Reuven Gordon
Professor and Canada Research Chair in Nanoplasmonics
enhanced photovoltaics to make solar energy conversion more efficient; optics for detection, spectroscopy and biosensors; optical manipulation and trapping; nanostructuring of metals to achieve enhanced light-matter interaction
Dr. Gordon studies the interaction of light with metal surfaces at scales as tiny as atoms and molecules. His research is leading to the development of sensors for the early detection of cancers, new tools to study viral infection and more efficient solar devices. He is working with industry on the use of light to reliably and predictably detect biomarkers of interest in the body.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Thirumarai Ilamparithi
Assistant Teaching Professor
condition monitoring of electric machines; modern smart/micro grid; engineering pedagogy; real time simulation; electric vehicles
Dr. Ilamparithi's three major research interests are: 1) Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis, with a focus on electrical machines, in particular synchronous motors. 2) Real-time modelling & simulation, with a focus in the field of electric power, especially in the emerging areas of modern smart grids and micro-grids. 3) Engineering pedagogy, by developing pedagogical approaches that would facilitate Electrical Engineering education.
Mechanical Engineering
Afzal Suleman
Professor, Canada Research Chair in Computational and Experimental Mechanics
ocean energy and technology; computational and experimental mechanics; multidisciplinary design; optimization; fluid-structure interaction; active aeroelastic and morphing aircraft structures; aeronautics and space
As a Canada Research Chair in Computational and Experimental Mechanics, Dr. Suleman aims to improve the performance of complex engineering systems. His research brings together emerging mathematical, computer and experimental models to design leaner, greener and safer next-generation aerospace systems. His research team are developing complex engineering systems featuring broad predictive and design optimization capabilities. His work will create engineering tools that will have a wide variety of applications in both aerospace and computer modelling. The research will ultimately, lead to quieter, cleaner aircraft that can meet increasingly tough environmental and safety regulations through reduced carbon dioxide emissions, weight reduction, improved manufacturing processes, more energy-efficient propulsion, and reliable maintenance.
Mechanical Engineering
Andrew Rowe
Professor
decarbonization of Canada's energy system; thermodynamics; energy systems; cryogenics; heat transfer
Dr. Rowe is the director of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems. His research spans advanced heat pumps, hydrogen technologies and techno-economics of energy systems. He is a principal investigator with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions’ 2060 Project examining decarbonization of Canada’s energy system.
Mechanical Engineering
Curran Crawford
Professor
wind and tidal turbine analysis and design; plug-in hybrid vehicles; sustainable energy systems; multidisciplinary design optimization; variable fidelity aerodynamic and structural modelling
Dr. Crawford specializes in sustainable energy systems, notably, in wind energy, specifically focusing his research on creating computer models of wind turbines that integrate multidisciplinary techniques. These digital simulations promise to be better predictors of turbine performance, without having to deploy real machines on site for testing. The goal is to produce more electricity at lower cost, especially with the growing demand for power.
Mechanical Engineering
Nedjib Djilali
Professor, Canada Research Chair in Energy System Design and Computational Modelling
energy systems; fluid dynamics; transport phenomena; fuel cell technology; hydrogen dispersion; integration of renewable energy in smart grids; energy, water and climate change; climate solutions; clean energy; engineering
Dr. Djilali is a Canada Research Chair in Energy System Design and Computational Modelling, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Canadian Academy of Engineering. He studies fuel cell science and technology and energy systems analysis, with a current focus on transport phenomena (fluid flow, heat, mass and charge transport) in porous materials, large scale integration of renewable energy in smart grids, and the coupling between energy, water and climate change. He has served as Director of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems and of the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.
Mechanical Engineering
Peter Wild
Professor
Mechatronics; mechanical design; sensors and instrumentation
Dr. Wild was the Executive Director of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems at UVic from 2012 to 2016, coordinating the work on energy science and technology on renewable energies, as well as large scale energy solutions. His own research is focused on the development of fibre optic sensors to measure hydrostatic pressures in intervertebral discs, the esophagus and coronary arteries as well as sensors to measure contact stress in articular joints.
Mechanical Engineering
Zuomin Dong
Professor
modeling, testing and design optimization of advanced hybrid electric vehicles (HEV/PHEV/EREV/FCV); hybrid marine vessels; fuel cell systems; meta-model based global optimization of complex, multi-physics systems; real-time optimal control of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles/ships; smart grid; traffic systems; automated optimal 5-axis CNC tool path planning and generation; climate change mitigation; transportation
Dr. Dong's research focuses on modelling and simulation of complex multi-physics systems, global optimization, real-time optimal control, and advanced manufacturing. He combines advanced computer modelling, optimization, and intelligent system to solve practical problems in design, control and manufacturing. His green transportation technology research team have focused on the developments of advanced HEV/PHEV/EREV/FCV modeling, simulation, design optimization, and real-time optimal control techniques in close collaboration with leading automotive, hybrid powertrain, fuel cell and green marine transportation technology developers, including GM, Ballard, AFCC, Azure Dynamics, BC Ferries, etc.

Fine Arts

 
Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Music
Colleen Eccleston
Sessional Lecturer
environmental music; song writing; performance; folk music; music Business; history of western music; jazz singers; history of Rock and Roll and The Beatles
Interested in climate and environmental music, Colleen Eccleston is a voice specialist in Theatre, vocal coach, songwriter, recording artist, rock, Celtic/Folk singer, actor, writer, history of rock and roll and Canadian folk music expert. Mentor for the BC Festival of the Arts in song writing. She is a singing and song writing instructor at the Victoria Conservatory of Music, and lecturer at the Victoria Conservatory of Music on Rock and Blues and Canadian Folk Music.
Music
Anna Höstman
Sessional instructor
music composing; climate inspired music; environmental music; music, interdiscipline and landscape; contemporary music
Dr. Höstman's music seeks out tactile encounters with the world while extending into story, memory, and landscape. Her compositional aesthetic is firmly rooted in experiences developed while active as a core member of the Intermission Interdisciplinary Collective (2002-2013). Some of her selected compositions relate to climate and environmental phenomena: IceFolding (2018), Coral (2018), The Invisible Forest (2017), Singing the Earth(2013), La Foret(2016).
Music
W. Andrew Schloss
Professor
music composing; music performance; contemporary music; radiorum; physiosonics; sonophenology; sonic interphases; climate change; physiosonics; acoustics
Dr. Schloss is a pioneer in new musical instruments, and a virtuoso on a new instrument called the Radiodrum. Along with other scholars, he developed a tangible interface called Sonophenology, which enables one or more users to concurrently specify point and range queries in both time and space and receive immediate sonic feedback, a system that can be used to study and explore the effects of climate change, both as tool to be used by scientists, and as a way to educate members of the general public. He is also co-founder of Physiosonics, creating auditory displays for anesthesiologists and physicians.
Theatre
Kirsten Sadeghi-Yekta
Assistant Professor
indigenous theatre and language revitalization; theatre in war and (post)-conflict zones; theatre in developing settings; theatre and global economics; Aesthetics, social justice and human rights within the field of applied theatre.
Dr. Sadeghi-Yekta has been involved in projects with different communities and in a variety of countries on social, economical and environmental issues as a theatre practitioner. Currently, she is working on her SSHRC Partnership Development Grant and Insight Development Grant on Coast Salish language revitalization through theatre.
Theatre
Yasmine Kandil
Assistant Professor and Grad. Advisor
applied theatre in climate crisis; theatre for development; testimonial theatre; applied theatre in post-revolution Egypt; immigrants and refugees; celebratory theatre; at-risk populations; theatre for social change.
Dr. Kandil's research has centred on theatre as a tool for self-expression with communities that are disenfranchised. Most recently she has gravitated towards using celebratory theatre to find deeper connections between students undertaking applied theatre initiatives, and community groups. Her most recent devised performance, Return to the Nile: Tales of Migration, was a funded research project that looked at the ways in which communities wish to be represented in applied theatre initiatives. This project involved six undergraduate students from Brocks Dramatic Arts program, and six members of the immigrant and refugee community.
Theatre
Warwick Dobson
Associate Professor
applied theatre; history of applied theatre; devised theatre; theatre- and drama-in-education; youth theatre; reminiscence theatre and the uses of drama and theatre in health education contexts.
Dr. Dobson has written some of the standard works on theatre and drama in schools and a number of articles on Applied Theatre (some related to environmental adaptation). He has worked extensively in Canada, the UK, Europe and the United States.
Visual Arts
Paul Walde
Associate Professor
climate change; visual arts; intermedia; music composing; landscape, identity and technology; sound and video;
Paul Walde is a intermedia artist, composer and curator whose work explores interconnections between landscape, identity and technology. He is currently working on a series of new sound and video works that will be part of an exhibition on View From Up Here: The Arctic and the Centre of the World.
Visual Arts
Carey Newman (Hayalthkin'geme)
Audain Professor
sculpture; carving; indigenous art; multi-disciplinary art; film; visual arts; social and environmental issues; impacts of colonialism and capitalism; memory; truth and reconciliation
Carey Newman (Hayalthkin'geme) is a multi-disciplinary Indigenous artist, master carver, filmmaker, author and public speaker. In his artistic practice he strives to highlight Indigenous, social, and environmental issues as he examines the impacts of colonialism and capitalism, harnessing the power of material truth to unearth memory and trigger the necessary emotion to drive positive change.
Visual Arts
Tara Nicholson
Instructor
climate science; arctic; photography; video; installation;
Tara Nicholson incorporates photography, video and installation to investigate the idea of going "further north" and the desire to visit remote territories. Since 2015, she has traveled to the Arctic to document climatology at science stations for an ongoing body of work titled "Arctic Claims". Throughout her research, there is a blurring of the line between fantasy, sci-fi and science while exploring the endless possibilities of climate research to render a new experience of northern landscape.
Visual Arts
Kelly Richardson
Associate Professor
climate change; video art; installation; audio; interdisciplinary research
Kelly Richardson is a video artist taking cues from 19th century painting, 20th century cinema and 21st century scientific inquiries. Her practice offers imaginative views and constructions of the future that are plausible enough to prompt careful consideration of the present. Her research is a critical and often collaborative engagement with scientists, philosophers and writers whose work engages with issues related to climate change.
Writing
Brian Payton
Harvey Southam Sessional Instructor
fiction; narrative nonfiction; nature & environmental writing; travel writing
He writes both fiction and nonfiction. His latest book, The Wind Is Not a River, was published in seven countries, was a national bestseller, and was chosen as an Amazon Book of the Month, an Amazon Canada Best Fiction of the Year, and a Best Book of the Year by both the Seattle Times and BookPage. He is also the author of the novel "Hail Mary Corner, Shadow of the Bear: Travels in Vanishing Wilderness" (a Barnes and Noble Book Club Pick and a U.S. National Outdoor Book Awards Book of the Year) and "The Ice Passage: A True Story of Ambition, Disaster, and Endurance in the Arctic Wilderness".
Writing
Tim Lilburn
Professor
poetry; philosophical essay; ecological essay; ecology and desire; contemplative practices and pedagogies
Dr. Lilburn is author of eleven books of poetry, including Kill-site, To the River, and Moosewood Sandhills, Assiniboia and Orphic Politics. He has been nominated for the Governor General's Award in Literature twice: in 1989, for Tourist to Ecstasy, and in 2003, when he received the award for Kill-site. His most recent book of poetry is the masque The House of Charlemagne, published by the University of Regina Press, 2018. His essay collection The Larger Conversation: Contemplation and Place came out with the University of Alberta Press in 2017. He is also the author of the earlier book of essays Living in the World as if It Were Home (1999), a book on ecology and desire.
Writing
David Leach
Professor
ecological literacy; creative nonfiction; literary journalism; nonfiction novel; adventure travel; magazine publishing; teaching with technology; sports writing; interactive narrative; video games and digital storytelling.
David Leach's first book, Fatal Tide: When the Race of a Lifetime Goes Wrong, was released in 2008 by Penguin Canada and won the Special Jury Mention at the Banff International Mountain Book Festival. His second book, Chasing Utopia: The Future of the Kibbutz in a Divided Israel, was published internationally by ECW Press in 2016 and earned nominations for a Vine Award for Canadian Jewish Literature and the Frank Hegyi Award. He has conducted research, given talks, organized conferences and done media interviews about the use of video games and interactive storytelling for art and education.
Writing
Kathryn Mockler
Assistant Professor
climate/eco writing; activism; small press publishing; short film writing; feature film writing; TV writing; poetry; short fiction; flash fiction; experimental writing; experimental video; hybrid genres; editing and publishing
Kathryn Mockler is an awarded author of four poetry books and six short films with environmental themes. Her most recent poetry project is a chapbook written in collaboration with Gary Barwin forthcoming from knife | fork | book in the fall of 2020, and her debut collection of stories will be published by Book*hug in 2022. She is also developing a TV series pilot called Yardbird and an experimental video series, This Isn't a Conversation.
Writing
Karen Rivers
Sessional Instructor
climate and environmental fiction; middle grade and young adult fiction.
Karen Rivers is the author of more than 20 novels for adult, middle grade and young adult audiences. Her most recent are A Possibility of Whales (Algonquin Books for Young Readers) and All That Was (FSG). Her book Before We Go Extinct is about a boy, who spends countless hours watching documentaries about sharks and climate change and texting his dead friend. He embarks on an adventure that will teach him about life and love.
Writing
Mark Leiren-Young
Sessional Instructor
environmental humor; Humor and comedy writing; creative nonfiction; journalism; stage drama; screenwriting; television (drama, comedy, children and variety); animation, documentary and writing for radio (drama and documentary)
Mark Leiren-Young is an awarded humorist and ecological writer whose debut movie, "The Green Chain" received several awards and nominations and played festivals around the world. His TV special Greenpieces: The World's First Eco-Comedy won an EarthVision Award. He has written two non-comic books of non-fiction "The Green Chain: Nothing is Ever Clear Cut", a collection of interviews dealing with the future of our forests and This Crazy Time written with/about controversial environmentalist Tzeporah Berman. Chain."

Human & Social Development

 

Humanities

Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
School of Child and Youth Care
Nevin Harper
Associate Professor
ecopsycholog; outdoor and adventure-based education and therapy; human-environmental relationships; experiential and environmental education; youth and emerging adult development; outdoor risky play.
Dr. Harper's research and practice centres on ecopsychology and alternative approaches to working with youth and families involved in systems of care and incarceration. His research and practice also focuses on the theory, process and outcomes associated with outdoor, adventure, and experiential activities and programs as they relate to educational, developmental or therapeutic aims. While primarily focused on adolescents, he also works on adventure education and therapy for child and youth care.
School of Child and Youth Care
Nicholas XEMŦOLTW̱ Claxton
Assistant Professor
fisheries; reef net fishery; revitalization and resurgence of Indigenous knowledges; community-based research; community-based learning
Dr. Claxton’s teaching and research is centered on the revitalization and resurgence of Indigenous knowledges through community-based research and education, in particular on reef net fishery banned by the colonial government 100 years ago.
School of Child and Youth Care
Shanne McCaffrey
Assistant Teaching Professor
land and water based learning, teaching, and interconnectedness; child Welfare; colonialism as a shared experience; environmental nurturing; preservation and activism; sharing the land with non-human relatives
Dr. McCaffrey's research interests include land and water based learning, teaching, and interconnectedness, child welfare, colonialism as a shared experience, environmental nurturing, preservation and activism, and sharing the land with non-human relatives.
School of Public Administration
Astrid Brouselle
Director and Professor
healthcare system analysis; evaluation theory and methods; sustainability; health system performance
Dr. Brouselle's main expertise is in evaluation theories and methods in healthcare and healthcare system analysis. She is particularly interested in contributing to the building of more sustainable and equitable societies.
School of Public Administration
Katya Rhodes
Assistant Professor
climate policy analysis; sustainability transitions; energy-economy modelling; climate action plan; comparative policy analysis; Inventory; low carbon economy; survey tools; media and content analysis; emissions modelling; CleanBC; environmental economics; flexible climate regulations
Dr. Rhodes investigates the topics of low-carbon economy transitions and climate policy design using survey tools, energy-economy models, media and content analysis. She worked in the British Columbia (BC) Climate Action Secretariat where she led greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions modelling and economic analyses for the provincial CleanBC plan. Her current research focuses on the design of effective and politically acceptable climate policies, as well as investigating key design features of 'flexible' climate regulations.
School of Public Administration
Sarah Wiebe
Assistant Professor
Environmental justice; arts-based participatory action research; situated bodies of knowledge; critical policy studies
Dr.Wiebe's research explores the entanglements between citizens, policies and ecosystems, as informed by the prismatic and layered lenses of interpretive analysis, policy justice and participatory policy-making. She is interested in how public policies affect situated communities and citizens and how they resist and respond to these political forces; critical policy studies; arts-based participatory action research; and political encounteres at the biopolitical and geopolitical nexus.
School of Public Administration
Tamara Krawchenko
Assistant Professor and Academic Undergraduate Advisor
coastal climate change; political economy and economic geography; comparative public policy; land use planning and strategic spatial planning; governance of land use; indigenous economic development; territorial policies; transportation and infrastructure policy; research methods and philosophy of social sciences; regional development; international frameworks; intergenerational equity.
Dr. Krawchenko is an interdisciplinary researcher who examines policies and institutions from multiple scales from international frameworks down to local politics, in topics such as coastal climate change, rural development, transportation and transit governance and intergenerational equity. She draws on institutionalism, political economy and economic geography to problematize scale and look at how policies impact 'place'.
School of Public Administration
Tara Ney
Associate Professor
climate action plans; climate leadership; collaborative governance regimes; discursive approaches to policy analysis; complaint system design and redress; socially-just decision-making processes; public policies; Innovative governance mechanisms and deliberative technologies; community development; developmental evaluation
Dr. Ney's main expertise is in designing inclusive but effective decision-making processes in organizations and communities. She is currently focused on applying these processes to accelerate just transitions to climate change initiatives in local government, as well as improving access to justice to ensure more equitable and accessible public sector organizations. She is currently involved in two major research projects, one of them: The Vancouver Island Climate Action Leadership Plan: A developmental evaluation, involves elected local government politicians and First Nations leaders on Vancouver Island who have responded to the state of emergency on climate change.
School of Public Health and Social Policy
Matthew Little
Assistant Professor
nutritional and environmental epidemiology; food security; food environments; nutrition and diet-related non-communicable diseases; global health; indigenous health; mixed methods research; social and cultural determinants of nutrition and health
Dr. Little conducts research on Global, First Nations, and Inuit health, community food security, nutrition-related non-communicable diseases, food systems and environments, ecological determinants of health, climate change and health, and environmental contaminants in food sources.
School of Public Health and Social Policy
Renée Monchalin
Assistant Professor
indigenous reproductive/ environmental rights and justice; sexual health; HIV and AIDS; culturally safe health and social services; traditional medicinal knowledges and land-based healing; Metis Peoples health and identity; decolonizing and indigenous research methodologies
Dr. Monchalin's research has focused on sexual health outreach and HIV prevention by and for Indigenous youth and communities, and intersectional spaces of Indigenous sexual, environmental, and reproductive health, rights, and justice. Her research focuses on urban Métis identity and access to health services and programming.
Social Work
Donna Jeffery
Associate Professor
environmentalism in social work; anti-racist and critical pedagogies; social work education and professional identity; knowledge production and modes of inquiry
Dr. Jeffrey's research is Interdisciplinary in orientation: feminist, critical race and post-structural scholarship in the contexts of pedagogy, policy, knowledge production, professional identity and social work education. She has developed research on environmentalism in social work.
Social Work
Jacquie Green
Associate Professor
Land Knowledge; land protocols and cultural medicines; storytelling
Dr. Green's research interests involve strategizing programs and policies that incorporate a strong Indigenous focus and analysis. She introduces undergraduate and graduate students to school by way of introducing students to understanding land acknowledgements, and facilitates site visits with local knowledge keepers to learn land protocol and about cultural medicines.
 
Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
English
Misao Dean
Professor
Canadian literature
Dr. Dean teaches courses on the Canadian novel, and is interested in non-fiction prose and travel writing as well. She has published extensively on early Canadian women writers, on the literature of wilderness travel, and on animals and hunting in early Canadian writing. Dr. Dean is currently working on theories of affect and literary pleasure, and on early Canadian writing about animals and the natural world.
English
Nicholas Bradley
Associate Professor
ecocriticism; literature; poetry; environmental literature; Canadian and American literature;
Dr. Bradley's academic interests lie primarily in Canadian literature and American literature, modern poetry, and the study of literature and the environment. His scholarly work and creative writing depend on a sense of place on the regional distinctiveness of the West Coast. By exploring the places and literary traditions of the Pacific Northwest, he aims to shed light on the rich and complex cultural history of the region.
English
Nicole Shukin
Associate Professor
biopower theory; canadian theory; animal studies; politics of nature; cultural, social and political thought
Dr. Shukin is a member of the interdisciplinary graduate program in Cultural, Social, and Political Thought (CSPT), and specializes in Canadian Literature, cultural studies (with a focus on theories of biopower, animal studies, and the politics of nature), and poststructuralist, (post) Marxist, and posthumanist theory. Recent graduate courses include seminars on "Zoo-texts: the Trace of the Animal in Contemporary Theory and Literature" (2009), "Forest Fetish: Reading the Nature of the West Coast" (2008) and "The Politics of Nature in the Era of Pandemic Capital".
English
Richard Pickard
Assistant Teaching Professor
environmental humanities; climate change; poetry; literature; Association for Literature, Environment and Culture in Canada (ALECC); forestry; BC forestry fiction and environmental ideology
Dr. Pickard teaches courses in environmental humanities, composition, and technical writing. His research interests are in the fields of environment and literature; 18th-century studies (especially poetry); the literature of labour; and writing from and about non-urban British Columbia. His current research looks at forest company comments about climate change, and about what BC forestry fiction has to say about the ideological elements behind those statements.
History
Elizabeth Vibert
Associate Professor
small-scale food producers in the era of climate crisis; history of poverty, race and gender; British colonial history.
Dr. Vibert's research interests are food insecurity and food sovereignty, particularly in colonized spaces and in the era of climate crisis; colonialism; and the intersecting histories of poverty, gender, and race. She examines the historical and contemporary causes of food crises, and powerful community-level responses, in four settings: South Africa, Colombia, Indigenous communities in southern and northern Canada, and refugee communities in Jordan.
History
Jason Colby
Professor and Undergraduate Adviser
environmental history; modern U.S. history; international relations; Pacific Northwest; Climate Solutions Navigator
Dr. Colby specializes in international business and environmental history, particularly on the transformation of environmental politics in the Pacific Northwest in the 1960s and 1970s. He is currently researching a book on the history of killer whales and humans over the last half-century in the Pacific Northwest.
Philosophy
Thomas Heyd
Sessional instructor
environmental aesthetics and Ethics
Dr. Heyd's research interests are: aesthetics, environmental aesthetics, ethics, history of philosophy with special interests in prehistoric and contemporary art, and early modern philosophy.

Law

 

Sciences

Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Law
Calvin Sandborn
Assistant Teaching Professor Legal Director of the Environmental Law Centre
environmental law; environmental reform; mining law and reform; plastics legislation
Professor Sandborn is the legal director of the Environmental Law Centre, and one of BC's most experienced environmental lawyers and lobbyists for environmental reform. He was instrumental in the ELC's report on the former federal government's "muzzling" of scientists, particularly in relation to climate change, which was followed by an investigation by Canada's Information Commissioner.
Law
Deborah Curran
Executive Director, Environmental Law Centre
climate change adaptation; water law; environmental law; environmental governance and sustainability; municipal law; growth management and land use law; agricultural land and food systems; real estate and shared-decision making; legal and policy structures ; regional sustainability; pedagogy of field courses and clinical learning; colonial law; indigenous laws
Professor Curran's research and practice focus on water and regional or watershed sustainability, with an interest in how legal and policy structures facilitate or impede us from adapting to changing ecological conditions, and shape decision-making through governance processes. Other interests are the pedagogy of field courses and clinical learning. All of her courses explore how colonial law interacts with or has an impact on indigenous laws and communities.
Law
Ted McDorman
Professor
public international law; international ocean law; law for climate adaptation; shared fisheries; Arctic
Professor McDorman's teaching areas include public international law, international trade law, international ocean and environmental law, and private international law (conflicts of law). He has expertise in international ocean law and policy. His publications include topics on international ocean law in the North Pacific, Canada's jurisdiction in the Arctic, international ocean law relations between Canada and the US, and Canada-US agreements on shared fisheries resources.
Law
Chris Tollefson
Professor
environmental law and governance; forestry and contaminated sites; aboriginal issues; access to justice for environmental groups; Paris agreement
Professor Tollefson specializes in public interest litigation, environmental governance, forestry and contaminated sites, as well as access to justice for environmental groups. He was the founding executive director of the UVic Environmental Law Centre.
 

Social Sciences

Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Biochemistry and Microbiology
Alistair Boraston
Professor
Carbohydrate catabolism; Carbon utilization
Dr. Boraston researches the pathways used by microorganisms to breakdown complex molecules containing photosynthetically fixed carbon in order to understand the global carbon cycle and inform novel bioproduct generation.
Biochemistry and Microbiology
Andrew Ross
Adjunct Professor
biomarkers of biotic and abiotic stress in marine organisms including fish, shellfish, and mammals; marine biotoxins
Dr. Ross is a Research Scientist at the DFO Institute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney, British Columbia. He develops and uses analytical methods to study biological and environmental processes that control the availability and distribution of trace elements, marine biotoxins and contaminants. His research involves profiling essential trace metals (micronutrients) and metal-binding compounds (ligands) in the ocean, developing mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods to detect and quantify toxic chemicals in the marine environment, using meta-proteomics to identify emerging biotoxins and ichthyotoxins in support of the BC aquaculture industry; and proteomic and metabolomic approaches to identify biomarkers of exposure and response to marine biotoxins.
Biochemistry and Microbiology
David Goodlett
Professor
Development of proteomic and metabolomic technology
Dr. Goodlett is an Don and Eleanor Rix Chair in Environmental and Biomedical Proteomics and pioneer in the development of multi-omic technology which is being applied to environmental assessment and sustainability. Applications include: bioremediation, effects of pollution on the environment, plant and animal stress response caused by climate change, changes in soil mineralization, defense mechanism in response to Mountain Pine Beetle, and fertilization mechanisms of Douglas Fir.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Adam Monahan
Professor
theoretical climate dynamics; boundary-layer meteorology; stochastic processes in ocean/atmosphere science; modelling biogeochemical dynamics; climate statistics.
Dr. Monahan is a climate physicist who develops advanced mathematical and computer models to investigate the complex atmospheric and ocean processes that shape weather and climate. Understanding these interactions will lead to improved predictive climate models, greater understanding of global warming, and more reliable weather forecasts.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Andrew Weaver
Professor
role of the oceans in climate change/variability; ocean/climate modelling; paleoclimate; physical oceanography; geophysical fluid dynamics
Dr. Weaver is an Order of British Columbia scientist and politician representing the riding of Oak Bay-Gordon Head in the British Columbia Legislative Assembly, and was the leader of the Green Party of British Columbia from 2015 to 2020. He was a lead author in the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th scientific assessments. Weaver is a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair and one of the world’s leading researchers in climate and ocean dynamics and a top mathematical paleoclimatologist.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Blake Dyer
Assistant Professor
sea level change; Earth history; sedimentology and stratigraphIc cycles; isotope geochemistry of carbonates; pale sea-level and Gia; late paleozoic ice age; ancient carbon cycle; meteoric diagenesis
Dr. Dyer's research focuses on the use sedimentary rocks to better understand how the Earth-system responds to changing boundary conditions. He investigates sedimentary records by merging modern data science tools and models with geospatial, geochemical, and stratigraphic data collected during detailed field work. He also develops methods to convert discrete sequences of sedimentary facies into quantified signals of environmental change (such as changing water depth), and collects sedimentary data from the Bahamas to refine the mantle rheology and ice history assumptions that underpin estimates of sea level during the last interglacial.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Colin Goldblatt
Associate Professor
Earth System view on atmospheres; evolution of Earth's atmospheric composition; climate physics (deep paleoclimate, dynamical climatology, radiative transfer, climate modelling); terrestrial planet evolution (solar system and exoplanets).
Dr. Goldblatt's research focus is the atmospheric evolution of Earth and Earth-like planets. This is an interdisciplinary problem of Earth System Science and Planetary Science, integrating atmospheric and climate science, geology and geochemistry. His motivating questions include: How has Earth's atmospheric composition and climate evolved throughout Earth history, and what has determined this? What controls (exo)planet habitability? How does life affect planetary evolution?
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Hansi Singh
Assistant Professor
atmosphere-ocean-ice interactions; coupled climate dynamics; climate variability and change; polar climates; climate sensitivity and radiative feedbacks
Dr. Singh researches the physical climate system, particularly the myriad of interactions between atmosphere, ocean, and ice that give rise to the Earth's climate. She is especially interested in the ever-evolving climate of the polar regions, both Antarctic and Arctic, as well as the large-scale transport of atmospheric water from equator to pole.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Jay Cullen
Professor
chemical oceanography; marine biogeochemistry of trace metals; bio-inorganic chemistry; paleoceanography and global change; stable isotope geochemistry; novel techniques for trace metals.
Dr. Cullen is a chemical oceanographer who studies trace elements, especially metals, in the marine environment and how they influence ecosystems and critical ocean processes. He also created and leads the InFORM network, which engages citizen scientists in collecting water and seafood samples to monitor low-level radioactivity from Japan's 2011 nuclear disaster.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
John Dower
Professor
Biological oceanography and marine ecology; Factors affecting the production; growth and survival of zooplankton and larval fish; marine food webs; effects of ocean climate on marine ecosystems
Dr. Dower's lab research is primarily field based, taking place mainly in coastal British Columbia and the open North Pacific.His lab works collaboratively with researchers at Fisheries and Oceans Canada to explore how variations in bottom-up forcing drive seasonal and interannual variations in the amount and type of zooplankton that are produced.His research also seeks to understand how changes in ocean climate (e.g. increasing temperatures and ocean acidification) may affect the structure and productivity of marine ecosystems in the future.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Jon Husson
Assistant Professor
Earth history, stratigraphy, sedimentary carbonates, stable isotope geochemistry, U-Pb geochronology
Dr. Husson studies the evolution of Earth's surface environment over geologic timescales, with a particular focus on the interactions between the biosphere, climate, sea level and ocean geochemistry. His work is grounded in field observations of sediments, particularly of carbonates' precipitates that simultaneously record information about the chemical, physical and biological conditions in which they formed.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Kathy Gillis
Professor
long-term carbon cycle; impacts of low temperature oceanic weathering on the Earth system; marine environment; seafloor; geological oceanography; fluid-rock interaction in oceanic hydrothermal systems; formation of the oceanic crust
Dr. Gillis is a marine geologist whose research focuses on the marine environment and, in particular, the geochemical cycles that result from interactions between the oceans and the solid earth and bear on broad issues such as the long-term carbon cycle. She is interested in what is going on several kilometres under the seafloor as she seeks to understand how the ocean crust forms and interacts with the seawater around it.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Kim Juniper
Professor
marine systems and global change; carbon sequestration; zooplankton; hydrothermal vent; nitrogen cycle
Dr. Juniper studies the relationships between environmental variability, microbial community dynamics, and biochemical rates of nitrogen removal, the links between blue carbon storage, marine vegetation, microbial characteristics of marine sediments, and the impact of habitat degradation on intertidal carbon sequestration. He is also interested in how individual species of zooplankton in the NE Pacific Ocean interact with prey resources in their environment, and how they may mediate biogeochemical processes involving carbon and nitrogen.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Laurence Coogan
Professor
long-term carbon cycle; the role of the oceanic lithosphere in the Earth system; controls on ocean chemistry; hydrothermal fluxes; petrology/geochemistry; mantle temperature
Dr. Coogan is a geochemist who studies the role of the oceanic lithosphere in the earth system. His research spans from understanding mantle temperature and composition through magma chamber process and high-temperature hydrothermal circulation to low-temperature off-axis hydrothermal systems. He uses field (shipboard and ophiolite), analytical, experimental and modelling studies.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Roberta Hamme
Associate Professor, Canada Research Chair
ocean carbon cycle and sequestration; chemical oceanography; dissolved gases; air-sea interaction and water mass formation; marine productivity rates; denitrification; BGC-Argo floats; mass spectrometric gas measurements
Dr. Hamme is the Canada Research Chair in Ocean Carbon Dynamics. She is an oceanographer who measures dissolved gases in the ocean to answer basic questions about the carbon cycle. She measures a suite of inert and bioactive gases, like argon and oxygen, to investigate oceanic processes and to learn about how gases move between the atmosphere and the ocean and what processes drive those fluxes, such as rapid cooling and bubbles created by breaking waves.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Ruohong Jiao
Assistant Professor
deglaciation; climate change; fission-track and (U-Th)/He; thermochronology; orogenic processes; landscape evolution modelling
Dr. Jiao is interested in Earth’s tectonic evolution and surface processes, and how their interaction shapes the landscape. He usse low-temperature thermochronology (fission-track and U-Th/He) to constrain the ages, rates, and magnitudes of the crustal deformation. Forward and inverse numerical analyses, such as thermal history and landscape evolution models, are frequently applied in his study to interpret the observed information. He is also very interested in sediment provenance analysis, in order to map the erosion intensity in the source catchments.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Stan Dosso
Professor
ocean acoustics and geoacoustics; marine-mammal acoustics; earthquake seismology; geophysical inverse theory
Dr. Dosso studies ocean and Arctic acoustics and marine seismology, seismo-acoustic propagation in sea ice, particularly investigating the use of geophones on the ice surface to monitor acoustic propagation within the water column. He is interested in acoustic localization in the Arctic.
Physics & Astronomy
Jody Klymak
Professor
physical oceanography; waves, turbulence, fronts, eddies; energy dissipation; ocean circulation; momentum, heat, salt, and passive tracers.
Dr. Klymak studies how water moves and mixes through the ocean, and collects and analyzes seagoing data. He creates numerical experiments designed to better understand small scale ocean flows, and their impacts on large scale flows (waves, turbulence, fronts and eddies).
 
Department
Faculty Member
Position
Research/Teaching areas
Full Description
Anthropology
Lisa Gould
Professor Emeritus
adaptation to anthropogenically-disturbed environments; conservation; primate ecology; lemurs; Madagascar
Dr. Gould researches ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) behavior and ecology in Madagascar, focusing on: ecology, socio-ecology, behavioral endocrinology, demography and conservation of Endangered Lemur catta. This research relates to evolutionary adaptations to natural habitats, as well as recent adaptations to anthropogenically-disturbed environments.
Anthropology
Iain McKechnie
Assistant Professor
historical ecology; coastal archaeology; zooarchaeology; Northwest Coast; fisheries
Dr. McKechnie is a coastal archaeologist interested in the history of food and settlement as a medium for understanding human-environmental relations on the Pacific Northwest Coast. His research focuses on the human use of animals, with a particular concentration on fish, shellfish, and marine mammals, exploring how these ancient records broaden contemporary perspectives on present day resource management challenges and the legacy of Indigenous settlement, use, and care for coastal environments.
Anthropology
Quentin Mackie
Associate Professor
archaeology; environmental change; resilience; Haida Gwaii; salish Sea; Stone tools; northwest Coast.
Dr. Mackie is an archaeologist who works on the early period of occupation of the coast of BC, mostly in Haida Gwaii, looking at how resilient Indigenous people have been in response to extreme environmental change. He is also interested in the archaeology of the drowned landscapes of the continental shelf.
Economics
Kees van Kooten
Professor and Canada Research Chair
agricultural economics; resource economics; forests ecosystems; environmental studies; carbon offsets
Dr. Van Kooten is the Canada Research Chair in Environmental Studies. He is an expert in agricultural and resource economies, carbon uptake in forest ecosystems and the economics of renewable energy (uptake of carbon in forest ecosystems, terrestrial carbon offsets).
Economics
Felix Pretis
Assistant Professor
econometrics; climate change; environmental economics
Dr. Pretis' research focuses on time series, panel, and spatial econometric methods with applications to climate change, environmental economics and natural resources. He also co-directs the Climate Econometrics project and research network.
Economics
Martin Farnham
Associate Professor
climate change; labour economics; urban economics; public economics; housing.
Dr. Farnham teaches and conducts research at the intersection of labour economics, public economics, and urban economics. His research focuses on a variety of applied topics including the effect of government policy on residential mobility, the effect of housing wealth shocks on household behaviour, aspects of job design within firms, and climate change.
Economics
Emma Hutchinson
Assistant Professor
environmental economics; Environmental policy; transboundary pollution; clean energy subsidies; Law & economics; liability for environmental accidents
Dr. Hutchinson studies the relationship between emissions and income growth for transboundary pollutants, the selective enforcement of environmental policy, subsidies for the production of cleaner energy, state enforcement of federal standards, and extended liability for environmental accidents.
Economics
Peter W. Kennedy
Associate Professor
climate change; environmental economics; environmental taxes; emissions trading; environmental impacts of trade and work; transboundary pollution
Dr. Kennedy's research focuses on theoretical issues in environmental economics, including work on environmental taxes, emissions trading, the environmental impacts of trade and growth, transboundary pollution, and climate change.
Geography
Chris Bone
Assistant Professor
climate and human-driven natural disturbances; impacts on human populations; geographic information systems (GIS); spatial analysis and modelling;
Dr. Bone's interdisciplinary work focuses on the social, natural, and computational sciences that examine how climate change and forest policies have influenced large scale forest insect outbreaks, and how governance structures respond and adapt to such environmental events. He employs a range of computational and analytical methods, including agent-based modelling, network modelling, web mapping, location-based technologies, geographic information systems, and remote sensing.
Geography
Olaf Niemann
Professor Emeritus
airborne hyperspectral data; multisensor imaging systems; forest attribute extraction; wetlands characterization; foliar bio-geochemistry
Dr. Niemann is the BC Leadership Chair in hyperspectral remote sensing, and lead of the hyperspectral - LiDAR research group at the university. His team applies a number of remote sensing technologies to environmental issues ranging from forest inventory to forest health to the mapping and evaluation of wetland environments.
Geography
Cameron Owens
Associate Teaching Professor
urban sustainability, environmental impact assessment, sustainability education
Dr. Owens' research interests surround critically assessing sustainable community development and environmental management efforts with a focus on the over-consumptive Global North. He is the Director of the Europe Sustainability Field School and Cascadia Sustainability Field School.
Geography
Fred Wrona
Professor
climate Impacts on hydrology and ecology; landuse and landscape disturbance impacts; biogeochemical impacts; cumulative impacts of multiple environmental stressors; aquatic biodiversity; impacts of climate change/variability on the food web dynamics of Arctic freshwater ecosystems; predicting effects of multiple environmental stressors on Canadian aquatic ecosystems
Dr. Wrona assesses climate change on the ecology of aquatic ecosystems, such as the food web dynamics of Arctic freshwater ecosystems. He is also the director of the aquatic ecosystem impacts research branch/division of the National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Chair of the Canadian National Committee for IHP, Chief Canadian Delegate to the UNESCO International Hydrology Program (IHP), and the Head of Delegation representing the Canadian Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) of the Arctic Council.
Geography
Sophia Carodenuto
Assistant Professor
climate policy and practice; forest governance; Africa studies; global value chains; tropical forests; Pacific Island States
Dr. Carodenuto conducts praxis-oriented research in the Global South around forest governance and the role of external influences (finance, transnational business, international policy) on domestic forest policy. She combines research with her work as a consultant, where she advises governments in developing countries.
Geography
Dan Smith
Professor
climate change in alpine areas and glacial environments; alpine geomorphology; dendrochronology
Dr. Smith is a dendrochronologist who studies the changing climate of high alpine and glacial environments, in particular, using high-resolution tree-ring analysis to determine the magnitude of climate change occurring in alpine areas.
Geography
Jutta Gutberlet
Professor
grassroots climate resilience; international community-based development; participatory and action research; food security; sustainable livelihoods; waste governance;
Dr. Gutberlet conducts participatory and action research oriented to development challenges on topics including: grassroots climate resilience, participatory resource management, food security, sustainable livelihoods, waste governance, and qualitative research methodology.
Geography
Terry Prowse
Professor
impacts of climate variability; water resources; freshwater ecosystems; cold-regions environments.
Dr. Prowse is an expert in the impacts of climate change on hydrology, water resources and freshwater ecosystems, with a special focus on the arctic environment.
Geography
David Atkinson
Professor
climate impacts on human and natural systems; coastal and marine ecosystems
Dr. Atkinson's research is focused on understanding how weather affects an array of human and natural systems, in particular along coastal regions and in the marine environment. He uses an array of techniques including computer model analysis, interviews, and field instrument deployments. His region of specialization is theArctic.
Geography
Randall Scharien
Assistant Professor
remote sensing; cryosphere; microwave remote sensing; sea ice; Arctic; polar marine environments
Dr. Scharien's research work falls within the domains of remote sensing and the cryosphere, with emphasis on the regional scale. He applies of remote sensing to study ice-covered ocean, especially summer sea ice in the Arctic. Current research projects in the Kitikmeot region of the Western Arctic focus on the discrimination of sea ice types and hazards during summer, and the study of sea ice phenology related to atmosphere-ocean mass and energy.
Geography
Mark Flaherty
Professor
small-scale fisheries; aquaculture; food security; developing world; multi-trophic aquaculture in Canada, First Nations perspectives
Dr. Flaherty's research is focused on the role that small-scale fisheries and aquaculture can play in improving food security and reducing poverty in the developing world. He is also interested in multi-trophic aquaculture in Canada and the perspectives of coastal communities, with an emphasis on First Nations.
Geography
Stephen Cross
Associate Professor
sustainable ecological aquaculture; coastal resource management; global agri-food production.
Dr. Cross' research focuses on environmental and economic aspects of sustainable ecological aquaculture (which uses the organic waste from one farmed organism as food for other farmed organisms) on the northwest coast of Vancouver Island.
Geography
Chris Darimont
Raincoast Research Chair in Applied Conservation Science, Associate Professor
conservation science; resource management; wildlife; marine-terrestrial interactions
Dr. Darimont is an interdisciplinary conservation scientist who applies natural and social science tools to confront conservation problems and policy-relevant work with Indigenous communities and their governments in coastal BC. His research focus is on the environment of the Great Bear Rainforest particularly the relationship between humans, bears and salmon.
Geography
Phil Dearden
Professor
conservation; protected areas; marine environment; resilience; tropical and subtropical ecosystems; community-based governance
Dr. Dearden is an expert in marine conservation and marine protected areas in Canada and Southeast Asia, who develops conservation initiatives such as ecotourism for coastal communities. He is a co-author of Parks and Protected Areas in Canada: Planning and Management, commonly used as a textbook on marine conservation in Canada.
Geography
Shannon Fargey
Assistant Professor
climate; mountain meteorology; hydrology; spatial analysis; field schools
Dr Fargey’s focus is primarily on program delivery, supporting student discovery and learning in Physical Geography and Geomatics. She is an experienced teacher in the fields of physical geography, geomatics and environmental sustainability: GIS analysis, geocaching, global environmental change and the human response, and disaster management. She has also led and participated in the creation of many departmental field schools.
Geography
Kristian Dubrawski
Canada Research Chair in Water Sustainability for Indigenous and Rural Communities, Assistant Professor
water quality and technology; community and ecological health; chemical/biological engineering
Dr. Dubrawski leads the Community Water Innovation Lab and holds the Canada Research Chair in Water Sustainability for Indigenous and Rural Communities. He was previously a UBC Liu Institute Scholar and the Director of Volunteers for Engineers Without Borders. He has worked as consultant in the Public Sector and Sustainability practices for McKinsey & Company, with Natural Resources Canada and Environment Canada.
Geography
Maycira Costa
Professor
remote sensing; coastal oceanography; wetlands; biogeophysical processes
Dr. Costa studies methods to make more effective the use of remote sensing imagery for understanding and monitoring biophysical processes in ocean waters and wetlands.
Geography
Rosaline Canessa
Associate Professor, Associate Dean of Social Sciences, Academic
spatial technologies for marine resources; conflicts and ecosystems protection; coastal resource management; Geographic Information Systems (GIS); seascape visualization; marine planning; collaborative work
Dr. Canessa studies technologies to help decision-makers manage marine resources, resolve user conflicts and protect key ecosystems. Through the Coastal and Ocean Resource Analysis Lab (CORAL), her research focuses on coastal resource management and the use of spatial technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and seascape visualization to support marine planning, particularly in collaborative settings, working closely with First Nations, and provincial and federal government agencies.
Political Science
Jamie Lawson
Associate Professor
ecology of forests politics and conflict; First Nations' economic and decision-making rights in the forest; workplace health and safety in forest industry; politics of Forest certification; environmental and natural-resource politics; Canadian politics and political economy; historical geography of resource policy conflict;
Dr. Lawson's research interests have centred on the political economy and ecology of contemporary forest politics and conflict, and on the application of theories of social space and time to the understanding of natural resource policy and politics. His current research interests include policy reform in the area of First Nations's economic and decision-making rights in the forest, the politics of forest certification programmes and other instances of non-state governance; the use of critical geography and the historical method in politics and political economy: Canadian public policy; federalism and interest intermediation.
Political Science
Wilfrid Greaves
Assistant Professor
climate change; natural resource extraction; Arctic politics; securitization; security theory; human and environmental security; Canadian foreign policy
Dr. Greaves is a political scientist whose research principally examines the intersections between security theory and environmental politics with focuses on climate change, energy extraction, Indigenous peoples, and the circumpolar Arctic. He has also published studies on Canadian foreign policy, complex peace operations, counterinsurgency, and Arctic governance.
Political Science
Scott Watson
Associate Professor and Chair
migration and refugee policy; disaster relief; humanitarianism and human security; securitisation; social construction of security/insecurity; International relations theory; international security
Dr. Watson's research interests have centred on the construction of security threats and conditions of national insecurity, particularly in the realm of migration, as well as the role various actors play in these processes. His research interests include re-conceptualizing human security as a process of securitisation; mapping the relationship of the mass media to the construction of insecurity. He teaches courses on international relations, security studies, nationalism and ethnic conflict and ethics in world politics.
Psychology
Frederick Grouzet
Associate Professor
environmental psychology; ecological well-being
Dr. Grouzet studies personal goals and values (as the core of self-identity) and psychological well-being, (e.g., happiness, optimal functioning), social well-being (e.g., positive leadership, social responsibility) and ecological well-being (e.g., ecological behaviours).
Psychology
Robert Gifford
Professor
environmental psychology; climate change; obstacles to climate action
Dr. Gifford is an expert on the barriers to sustainable behaviour. His research interests are at the interface of environmental, social, and personality psychology. He works to combine all three areas in studies of resource management, social judgment and cognition, nonverbal behaviour, and the perception of architecture, and also develops tools to measure personality, environmental, and social constructs.
School of Environmental Studies
Eric Higgs
Professor
ecosystem undergoing rapid change; ecological restoration; hybrid and novel ecosystems; Mountain Legacy Project; long-term landscape change in Canada’s mountains
Dr. Higg's work is anchored in ecological restoration, but has expanded in recent years to include appropriate ways of intervening in hybrid and novel ecosystems (ecosystems without historical precedent in an era of rapid ecological, environmental and cultural change). He has directed the interdisciplinary field-based Mountain Legacy Project, studying long-term landscape change in Canada’s mountains using repeat photography.
School of Environmental Studies
Trevor Lantz
Associate Professor
climate change; warming permafrost; disturbance; vegetation change; anthropogenic disturbance
Dr. Lantz is a terrestrial ecologist who studies environmental change in northern ecosystems, with projects in the western Arctic focus on permafrost degradation, storm surges, shrub encroachment, catastrophic lake drainage, anthropogenic disturbance, and community-based environmental monitoring.
School of Environmental Studies
Karena Shaw
Associate Professor
environmental studies; political ecology; global issues in sustainability; climate, energy and politics; advanced topics in sustainable communities
Dr. Shaw is apolitical theorist by training, she is particularly interested in how contemporary environmental challenges are reshaping political space and possibility. She has published in the areas of feminist theory, Indigenous politics, and environmental politics.
School of Environmental Studies
Natalie Ban
Associate Professor
evaluation and mapping of cumulative impacts; ethnoecology; conservation biology; marine spatial planning; conservation planning and implementation; marine and coastal systems
Dr. Ban's research focus is on ethnoecology, conservation biology, marine spatial planning, conservation planning, implementation, evaluation and mapping of cumulative impacts, all mainly in marine and coastal systems.
Sociology
Anelyse Weiler
Assistant Professor
environmental sociology; food and agriculture; migration; food security food and farm workers; qualitative methods; political ecology; community-based research
Dr. Weiler's research explores the convergence of social inequalities and environment crises in the food system, with a focus on struggles for viable agrarian livelihoods, dignified migration, decent work, and resilient farm ecosystems. Her interdisciplinary projects have included community-based research on local food and migrant justice movements, the environmental and cultural politics of meat production, the revival of North American craft cider, food sovereignty and health equity, and comparative analyses of global farm labour-migration programs.
Sociology
Martha McMahon
Associate Professor
environmental sociology; climate adaptation; food; farming, agri-food governance; food sovereignty; agriculture and the local; gender and food security; feminist analysis; ecological feminism.
Dr. McMahon's research interests are: food, farming, agri-food governance, food sovereignty, gender and food security, environmental sociology and feminist analysis, including ecological feminism. She is currently investigating survival and other strategies local farmers use to make their farming work under challenging circumstances. Her current research focus is on gender and environment, small-scale farming and local food.
Sociology
William K. Carroll
Professor
climate crisis; ecology; corporate power; fossil capitalisms; carbon-extractive corporate sector; civil resistance; global political economy
Dr. Carroll is a critical sociologist with research interests in the political economy/ecology of corporate capitalism, social movements and social change, and critical social theory and method. His current research is focused around the relationships between corporate power, fossil capitalism and the climate crisis.
Sociology
Sean Hier
Professor
moral panic; environmental panic and anxiety; social problems; sociology of knowledge; moral regulation/control; race and racism; surveillance; identity and belonging
Dr. Heir studies moral panics and social problems. He uses a social constructionist perspective (in the sociology of knowledge sense of the term) to investigate a broader range of theoretical and empirical issues. He teaches in the area of theory, social problems and moral regulation/control.

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